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Article: An increase in the prevalence of type 1 and 2 diabetes in children and adolescents: Results from prescription data from a UK general practice database

TitleAn increase in the prevalence of type 1 and 2 diabetes in children and adolescents: Results from prescription data from a UK general practice database
Authors
KeywordsAntidiabetic drugs
Diabetes
Epidemiology
Paediatric
Prevalence
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJCP
Citation
British Journal Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2009, v. 67 n. 2, p. 242-249 How to Cite?
AbstractWhat is already known about this subject • Increasing antidiabetic drugs use in youths has been reported in the USA, however there is a lack of epidemiological evidence in the UK. • There is an increase in the prevalence of both type 1 and 2 diabetes, but precise estimates are difficult to obtain and as such are uninformative for future health services planning. What this study adds • The prevalence of children receiving insulin and oral antidiabetic drugs has increased twofold and eightfold, respectively, between 1998 and 2005. • The data reflect the prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes rapidly increase in recent years. • The prevalence of antidiabetic drug use increases with increasing age, especially among those aged 12-18 years. • Consideration needs to be given to the funding and design of future services for children and particularly adolescents with diabetes to take account of these epidemiological findings. Aims: Despite evidence of an increase in the incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in youths, there are few data on the prevalence of either type in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of childhood diabetes over an 8-year period in the UK. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study that covered 8 years (January 1998 to December 2005) of UK IMS Disease Analyzer (IMS DA) data. The cohort comprised all children and adolescents aged 0-18 years who received at least one antidiabetic drug prescription during the study period. The prevalence of antidiabetic drug prescribing was used as a proxy for diabetes itself. Results: Data were available on 505 754 children aged 0-18 years and a total of 37 225 antidiabetic prescriptions were issued. Insulin use increased significantly from 1.08 per 1000 children [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96, 1.20] in 1998 to 1.98 (95% CI 1.80, 2.10) in 2005 (P < 0.001), more markedly in those aged 12 and 18 years. The use of oral antidiabetic drugs for diabetes treatment rose significantly from 0.006 per 1000 children in 1998 (95% CI 0.0043, 0.017) to 0.05 (95% CI 0.025, 0.080) (P < 0.001) in 2005. Conclusions: This study indicates a significant increase in prevalence on both type 1 and type 2 diabetes treatment in children and adolescents in the UK. Thus, this supporting evidence from other sources that the prevalence of childhood diabetes is rising rapidly. Further epidemiological studies are required to investigate the aetiology and risk factors. © 2009 The British Pharmacological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132868
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.83
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.486
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsia, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNeubert, ACen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRani, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorViner, RMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHindmarsh, PCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-04T07:57:41Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-04T07:57:41Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2009, v. 67 n. 2, p. 242-249en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0306-5251en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132868-
dc.description.abstractWhat is already known about this subject • Increasing antidiabetic drugs use in youths has been reported in the USA, however there is a lack of epidemiological evidence in the UK. • There is an increase in the prevalence of both type 1 and 2 diabetes, but precise estimates are difficult to obtain and as such are uninformative for future health services planning. What this study adds • The prevalence of children receiving insulin and oral antidiabetic drugs has increased twofold and eightfold, respectively, between 1998 and 2005. • The data reflect the prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes rapidly increase in recent years. • The prevalence of antidiabetic drug use increases with increasing age, especially among those aged 12-18 years. • Consideration needs to be given to the funding and design of future services for children and particularly adolescents with diabetes to take account of these epidemiological findings. Aims: Despite evidence of an increase in the incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in youths, there are few data on the prevalence of either type in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of childhood diabetes over an 8-year period in the UK. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study that covered 8 years (January 1998 to December 2005) of UK IMS Disease Analyzer (IMS DA) data. The cohort comprised all children and adolescents aged 0-18 years who received at least one antidiabetic drug prescription during the study period. The prevalence of antidiabetic drug prescribing was used as a proxy for diabetes itself. Results: Data were available on 505 754 children aged 0-18 years and a total of 37 225 antidiabetic prescriptions were issued. Insulin use increased significantly from 1.08 per 1000 children [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96, 1.20] in 1998 to 1.98 (95% CI 1.80, 2.10) in 2005 (P < 0.001), more markedly in those aged 12 and 18 years. The use of oral antidiabetic drugs for diabetes treatment rose significantly from 0.006 per 1000 children in 1998 (95% CI 0.0043, 0.017) to 0.05 (95% CI 0.025, 0.080) (P < 0.001) in 2005. Conclusions: This study indicates a significant increase in prevalence on both type 1 and type 2 diabetes treatment in children and adolescents in the UK. Thus, this supporting evidence from other sources that the prevalence of childhood diabetes is rising rapidly. Further epidemiological studies are required to investigate the aetiology and risk factors. © 2009 The British Pharmacological Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJCPen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subjectAntidiabetic drugsen_HK
dc.subjectDiabetesen_HK
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectPaediatricen_HK
dc.subjectPrevalenceen_HK
dc.titleAn increase in the prevalence of type 1 and 2 diabetes in children and adolescents: Results from prescription data from a UK general practice databaseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2125.2008.03347.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19260863en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2670382-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-61349168349en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-61349168349&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume67en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage242en_HK
dc.identifier.epage249en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2125-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263678100012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsia, Y=35068032100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNeubert, AC=7003774960en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRani, F=24336008200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridViner, RM=7005899067en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHindmarsh, PC=7102095952en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4104435-

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