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Article: Prioritizing children's medicines for research: A pharmacoepidemiological study of antiepileptic drugs

TitlePrioritizing children's medicines for research: A pharmacoepidemiological study of antiepileptic drugs
Authors
KeywordsAnticonvulsants/antiepileptic drugs
Child/adolescent/infant
Drug utilization
Epilepsy
Pharmacoepidemiology
Issue Date2007
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJCP
Citation
British Journal Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2007, v. 63 n. 6, p. 689-697 How to Cite?
AbstractAims: To investigate the prescribing epidemiology, in UK primary care, of newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) compared with conventional AEDs and to identify AEDs for further research in response to the European Medicines Agency report on epilepsy. Methods: Subjects aged 0-18 years, from the UK General Practice Research Database, who were prescribed an AED between 1993 and 2005. Prescribing prevalence and incidence, stratified by age and AED, were calculated. Results: A total of 7721 subjects were included and 70% were prescribed one drug. Overall prescribing prevalence for all AEDs had increased by 19%. The prevalence (95% confidence interval) of newer AED prescribing had increased fivefold from 0.67 (0.58, 0.76) to 3.20 (3.03, 3.37) per 1000 person-years. Conversely, the prevalence of conventional AEDs had declined by 17% from 6.63 (6.34, 6.92) per 1000 person-years to 5.51 (5.28, 5.73). Lamotrigine had 65% of newer AED prescriptions and was the most prescribed newer drug for both the 2-11 years and 12-18 years age groups with prevalences of 1.47 and 2.55 per 1000 person-years, respectively. Conclusions: There is a rapid increase in newer AED prescribing to children and adolescents in UK primary care, while prescribing of conventional AEDs is declining. Since 1997, the prevalence of vigabatrin has fallen, coinciding with the UK safety warnings on visual field defects. The uptake of lamotrigine, topiramate and levetiracetam is rapid and as the safety of these drugs has not been established, they should be prioritized for further research. Following concerns with vigabatrin, long-term safety surveillance of all newer AEDs is strongly recommended. © 2007 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132865
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.83
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.486
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAckers, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorMurray, MLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBesag, FMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-04T07:57:40Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-04T07:57:40Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Clinical Pharmacology, 2007, v. 63 n. 6, p. 689-697en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0306-5251en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132865-
dc.description.abstractAims: To investigate the prescribing epidemiology, in UK primary care, of newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) compared with conventional AEDs and to identify AEDs for further research in response to the European Medicines Agency report on epilepsy. Methods: Subjects aged 0-18 years, from the UK General Practice Research Database, who were prescribed an AED between 1993 and 2005. Prescribing prevalence and incidence, stratified by age and AED, were calculated. Results: A total of 7721 subjects were included and 70% were prescribed one drug. Overall prescribing prevalence for all AEDs had increased by 19%. The prevalence (95% confidence interval) of newer AED prescribing had increased fivefold from 0.67 (0.58, 0.76) to 3.20 (3.03, 3.37) per 1000 person-years. Conversely, the prevalence of conventional AEDs had declined by 17% from 6.63 (6.34, 6.92) per 1000 person-years to 5.51 (5.28, 5.73). Lamotrigine had 65% of newer AED prescriptions and was the most prescribed newer drug for both the 2-11 years and 12-18 years age groups with prevalences of 1.47 and 2.55 per 1000 person-years, respectively. Conclusions: There is a rapid increase in newer AED prescribing to children and adolescents in UK primary care, while prescribing of conventional AEDs is declining. Since 1997, the prevalence of vigabatrin has fallen, coinciding with the UK safety warnings on visual field defects. The uptake of lamotrigine, topiramate and levetiracetam is rapid and as the safety of these drugs has not been established, they should be prioritized for further research. Following concerns with vigabatrin, long-term safety surveillance of all newer AEDs is strongly recommended. © 2007 The Authors.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJCPen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subjectAnticonvulsants/antiepileptic drugsen_HK
dc.subjectChild/adolescent/infanten_HK
dc.subjectDrug utilizationen_HK
dc.subjectEpilepsyen_HK
dc.subjectPharmacoepidemiologyen_HK
dc.titlePrioritizing children's medicines for research: A pharmacoepidemiological study of antiepileptic drugsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2125.2006.02842.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17257162-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2000594-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34248589701en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34248589701&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume63en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage689en_HK
dc.identifier.epage697en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2125-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000246576800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAckers, R=16308666600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, ML=7403583537en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBesag, FMC=7004367676en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1303506-

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