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Article: Interventions to reduce dosing errors in children: A systematic review of the literature

TitleInterventions to reduce dosing errors in children: A systematic review of the literature
Authors
KeywordsChildren
Legislation
Medication errors
Prescribing
Issue Date2007
PublisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://drugsafety.adisonline.com/
Citation
Drug Safety, 2007, v. 30 n. 12, p. 1111-1125 How to Cite?
AbstractChildren are a particularly challenging group of patients when trying to ensure the safe use of medicines. The increased need for calculations, dilutions and manipulations of paediatric medicines, together with a need to dose on an individual patient basis using age, gestational age, weight and surface area, means that they are more prone to medication errors at each stage of the medicines management process. It is already known that dose calculation errors are the most common type of medication error in neonatal and paediatric patients. Interventions to reduce the risk of dose calculation errors are therefore urgently needed. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify published articles reporting interventions; 28 studies were found to be relevant. The main interventions found were computerised physician order entry (CPOE) and computer-aided prescribing. Most CPOE and computer-aided prescribing studies showed some degree of reduction in medication errors, with some claiming no errors occurring after implementation of the intervention. However, one study showed a significant increase in mortality after the implementation of CPOE. Further research is needed to investigate outcomes such as mortality and economics. Unit dose dispensing systems and educational/risk management programmes were also shown to reduce medication errors in children. Although it is suggested that 'smart' intravenous pumps can potentially reduce infusion errors in children, there is insufficient information to draw a conclusion because of a lack of research. Most interventions identified were US based, and since medicine management processes are currently different in different countries, there is a need to interpret the information carefully when considering implementing interventions elsewhere. © 2007 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132863
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.206
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.359
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorConroy, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSweis, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorPlanner, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorCollier, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHaines, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-04T07:57:39Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-04T07:57:39Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDrug Safety, 2007, v. 30 n. 12, p. 1111-1125en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0114-5916en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132863-
dc.description.abstractChildren are a particularly challenging group of patients when trying to ensure the safe use of medicines. The increased need for calculations, dilutions and manipulations of paediatric medicines, together with a need to dose on an individual patient basis using age, gestational age, weight and surface area, means that they are more prone to medication errors at each stage of the medicines management process. It is already known that dose calculation errors are the most common type of medication error in neonatal and paediatric patients. Interventions to reduce the risk of dose calculation errors are therefore urgently needed. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify published articles reporting interventions; 28 studies were found to be relevant. The main interventions found were computerised physician order entry (CPOE) and computer-aided prescribing. Most CPOE and computer-aided prescribing studies showed some degree of reduction in medication errors, with some claiming no errors occurring after implementation of the intervention. However, one study showed a significant increase in mortality after the implementation of CPOE. Further research is needed to investigate outcomes such as mortality and economics. Unit dose dispensing systems and educational/risk management programmes were also shown to reduce medication errors in children. Although it is suggested that 'smart' intravenous pumps can potentially reduce infusion errors in children, there is insufficient information to draw a conclusion because of a lack of research. Most interventions identified were US based, and since medicine management processes are currently different in different countries, there is a need to interpret the information carefully when considering implementing interventions elsewhere. © 2007 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://drugsafety.adisonline.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDrug Safetyen_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectLegislationen_HK
dc.subjectMedication errorsen_HK
dc.subjectPrescribingen_HK
dc.titleInterventions to reduce dosing errors in children: A systematic review of the literatureen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid18035864-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-36448978796en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-36448978796&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume30en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1111en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1125en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251757300003-
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridConroy, S=7005550949en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSweis, D=6505801311en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPlanner, C=15519885100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, V=9841023300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCollier, J=7203048706en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHaines, L=11239478000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_HK

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