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Article: Treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome with traditional Chinese herbal medicine: A randomized placebo-controlled trial

TitleTreatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome with traditional Chinese herbal medicine: A randomized placebo-controlled trial
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.html
Citation
American Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2006, v. 101 n. 7, p. 1574-1580 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: As there is no effective treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), many patients turn to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for possible cure. We investigated the therapeutic efficacy of an ancient herbal Chinese formula in patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS. METHODS: This was a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled trial. Chinese IBS patients with predominant diarrhea symptoms that fulfilled Rome II criteria were recruited. The diagnosis was verified by a TCM herbalist using TCM criteria. Eligible patients were randomized to receive a standard preparation of TCM extracts that contained 11 herbs or placebo with similar appearance and taste for 8 wk after a 2-wk run-in period. Patients were followed up for an additional 8 wk post-treatment. Primary outcome was patient's global symptom assessment. Other outcome measures included individual IBS symptom scores and health-related quality of life (short form 36). RESULTS: One hundred nineteen patients were randomized: 60 to receive TCM and 59 to receive placebo. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with global symptom improvement between the TCM and placebo groups at week 8 (35% vs 44.1%, p = 0.38) and at week 16 (31.7% vs 33.9%, p = 0.62). Moreover, there was no difference in individual symptom scores and the quality-of-life assessment between the two groups at all time points. BACKGROUND: The use of this herbal formulation for diarrhea-predominant IBS did not lead to global symptom improvement. Further controlled clinical studies may be necessary to characterize the role of TCM in the management of IBS. © 2006 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology. Published by Blackwell Publishing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132855
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 10.383
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.946
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, JCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiang, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, LSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, FKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXie, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFung, SSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, VWSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChe, CTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSung, JJYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-04T07:57:28Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-04T07:57:28Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Gastroenterology, 2006, v. 101 n. 7, p. 1574-1580en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-9270en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132855-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: As there is no effective treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), many patients turn to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for possible cure. We investigated the therapeutic efficacy of an ancient herbal Chinese formula in patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS. METHODS: This was a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled trial. Chinese IBS patients with predominant diarrhea symptoms that fulfilled Rome II criteria were recruited. The diagnosis was verified by a TCM herbalist using TCM criteria. Eligible patients were randomized to receive a standard preparation of TCM extracts that contained 11 herbs or placebo with similar appearance and taste for 8 wk after a 2-wk run-in period. Patients were followed up for an additional 8 wk post-treatment. Primary outcome was patient's global symptom assessment. Other outcome measures included individual IBS symptom scores and health-related quality of life (short form 36). RESULTS: One hundred nineteen patients were randomized: 60 to receive TCM and 59 to receive placebo. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with global symptom improvement between the TCM and placebo groups at week 8 (35% vs 44.1%, p = 0.38) and at week 16 (31.7% vs 33.9%, p = 0.62). Moreover, there was no difference in individual symptom scores and the quality-of-life assessment between the two groups at all time points. BACKGROUND: The use of this herbal formulation for diarrhea-predominant IBS did not lead to global symptom improvement. Further controlled clinical studies may be necessary to characterize the role of TCM in the management of IBS. © 2006 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology. Published by Blackwell Publishing.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ajg/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Gastroenterologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshDiarrhea - drug therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDouble-Blind Methoden_HK
dc.subject.meshDrugs, Chinese Herbalen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshIrritable Bowel Syndrome - drug therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMedicine, Chinese Traditionalen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshPlacebosen_HK
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshQuality of Lifeen_HK
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametricen_HK
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_HK
dc.titleTreatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome with traditional Chinese herbal medicine: A randomized placebo-controlled trialen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, WK:waikleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, WK=rp01479en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1572-0241.2006.00576.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16863563en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33745583485en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33745583485&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume101en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1574en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1580en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1572-0241-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000238654300026-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, WK=7201504523en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, JCY=7409260329en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiang, SM=7402146582en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, LS=20933661600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, FKL=7202586434en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXie, H=7401673075en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, SSL=7201970030en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, AJ=7102453674en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, VWS=7202525502en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChe, CT=7102442768en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSung, JJY=35405352400en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike731159-

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