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Article: Does change in positive affect mediate and/or moderate the impact of symptom distress on psychological adjustment after cancer diagnosis? A prospective analysis

TitleDoes change in positive affect mediate and/or moderate the impact of symptom distress on psychological adjustment after cancer diagnosis? A prospective analysis
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Colorectal cancer
Positive affect
Resilience
Resource change
Issue Date2010
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08870446.asp
Citation
Psychology And Health, 2010, v. 25 n. 4, p. 417-431 How to Cite?
AbstractPhysical symptom distress is one of the commonest correlates of psychological adjustment in cancer patients. Positive affect (PA) can be a dynamic resource for patients to cope with the cancer-related physical demands. The present study examined whether differential patterns of change in PA were associated with anxiety and depressed mood, and whether PA modified the association between change in symptom distress and psychological distress in 215 Chinese people newly diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC). Participants completed measures of physical symptoms, PA, and anxiety and depression at diagnosis and again at 3-month follow-up. Multivariate analyses of covariance revealed that at follow-up, people reporting higher anxiety and depressed mood demonstrated loss in PA, whereas those reporting lower depressed mood demonstrated a gain in PA. Structural equation modelling revealed that change in PA significantly mediated and moderated the associations between increased symptom distress and anxiety and depressed mood. We conclude that in line with Hobfoll's conservation of resources theory, continuous physical symptom distress depletes PA of newly diagnosed cancer patients, resulting in higher levels of anxiety and depressed mood. Effectiveness of symptom management intervention could be enhanced by preserving or enhancing PA in patients. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132835
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.983
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.960
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHou, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, CCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFu, YTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-31T00:55:13Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-31T00:55:13Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychology And Health, 2010, v. 25 n. 4, p. 417-431en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0887-0446en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132835-
dc.description.abstractPhysical symptom distress is one of the commonest correlates of psychological adjustment in cancer patients. Positive affect (PA) can be a dynamic resource for patients to cope with the cancer-related physical demands. The present study examined whether differential patterns of change in PA were associated with anxiety and depressed mood, and whether PA modified the association between change in symptom distress and psychological distress in 215 Chinese people newly diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC). Participants completed measures of physical symptoms, PA, and anxiety and depression at diagnosis and again at 3-month follow-up. Multivariate analyses of covariance revealed that at follow-up, people reporting higher anxiety and depressed mood demonstrated loss in PA, whereas those reporting lower depressed mood demonstrated a gain in PA. Structural equation modelling revealed that change in PA significantly mediated and moderated the associations between increased symptom distress and anxiety and depressed mood. We conclude that in line with Hobfoll's conservation of resources theory, continuous physical symptom distress depletes PA of newly diagnosed cancer patients, resulting in higher levels of anxiety and depressed mood. Effectiveness of symptom management intervention could be enhanced by preserving or enhancing PA in patients. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08870446.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology and Healthen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThis is an electronic version of an article published in Psychology & Health, 2010, v. 25 n. 4, p. 417-431. Psychology & Health is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/-
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectColorectal canceren_HK
dc.subjectPositive affecten_HK
dc.subjectResilienceen_HK
dc.subjectResource changeen_HK
dc.titleDoes change in positive affect mediate and/or moderate the impact of symptom distress on psychological adjustment after cancer diagnosis? A prospective analysisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0887-0446&volume=25&issue=4&spage=417&epage=431&date=2010&atitle=Does+change+in+positive+affect+mediate+and/or+moderate+the+impact+of+symptom+distress+on+psychological+adjustment+after+cancer+diagnosis?+A+prospective+analysis-
dc.identifier.emailHou, WK:en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHou, WK=rp01481en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/08870440802559375en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20397294-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951199608en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros166524-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951199608&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage417en_HK
dc.identifier.epage431en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000277649700002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHou, WK=35147323500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, CC=23091606600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFu, YT=7404433569en_HK

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