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Article: Connections with connexins: The molecular basis of direct intercellular signaling

TitleConnections with connexins: The molecular basis of direct intercellular signaling
Authors
KeywordsChannel
Connexon
Gap junction
Intercellular communication
Issue Date1996
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EJB
Citation
European Journal Of Biochemistry, 1996, v. 238 n. 1, p. 1-27 How to Cite?
AbstractAdjacent cells share ions, second messengers and small metabolites through intercellular channels which are present in gap junctions. This type of intercellular communication permits coordinated cellular activity, a critical feature for organ homeostasis during development and adult life of multicellular organisms. Intercellular channels an structurally more complex than other ion channels, because a complete cell-to-cell channel spans two plasma membranes and results from the association of two half channels, or connexons, contributed separately by each of the two participating cells. Each connexon, in turn, is a multimeric assembly of protein subunits. The structural proteins comprising these channels, collectively called connexins, are members of a highly related multigene family consisting of at least 13 members. Since the cloning of the first connexin in 1986, considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the complex molecular switches that control the formation and permeability of intercellular channels. Analysis of the mechanisms of channel assembly has revealed the selectivity of inter-connexin interactions and uncovered novel characteristics of the channel permeability and gating behavior. Structure/function studies have begun to provide a molecular understanding of the significance of connexin diversity and demonstrated the unique regulation of connexins by tyrosine kinases and oncogenes. Finally, mutations in two connexin genes have been linked to human diseases. The development of more specific approaches (dominant negative mutants, knockouts, transgenes) to study the functional role of connexins in organ homeostasis is providing a new perception about the significance of connexin diversity and the regulation of intercellular communication.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132748
ISSN
2006 Impact Factor: 3.579
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBruzzone, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorWhite, TWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPaul, DLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:28:43Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:28:43Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Biochemistry, 1996, v. 238 n. 1, p. 1-27en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0014-2956en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132748-
dc.description.abstractAdjacent cells share ions, second messengers and small metabolites through intercellular channels which are present in gap junctions. This type of intercellular communication permits coordinated cellular activity, a critical feature for organ homeostasis during development and adult life of multicellular organisms. Intercellular channels an structurally more complex than other ion channels, because a complete cell-to-cell channel spans two plasma membranes and results from the association of two half channels, or connexons, contributed separately by each of the two participating cells. Each connexon, in turn, is a multimeric assembly of protein subunits. The structural proteins comprising these channels, collectively called connexins, are members of a highly related multigene family consisting of at least 13 members. Since the cloning of the first connexin in 1986, considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the complex molecular switches that control the formation and permeability of intercellular channels. Analysis of the mechanisms of channel assembly has revealed the selectivity of inter-connexin interactions and uncovered novel characteristics of the channel permeability and gating behavior. Structure/function studies have begun to provide a molecular understanding of the significance of connexin diversity and demonstrated the unique regulation of connexins by tyrosine kinases and oncogenes. Finally, mutations in two connexin genes have been linked to human diseases. The development of more specific approaches (dominant negative mutants, knockouts, transgenes) to study the functional role of connexins in organ homeostasis is providing a new perception about the significance of connexin diversity and the regulation of intercellular communication.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EJBen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Biochemistryen_HK
dc.subjectChannelen_HK
dc.subjectConnexonen_HK
dc.subjectGap junctionen_HK
dc.subjectIntercellular communicationen_HK
dc.titleConnections with connexins: The molecular basis of direct intercellular signalingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBruzzone, R: bruzzone@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBruzzone, R=rp01442en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1432-1033.1996.0001q.x-
dc.identifier.pmid8665925-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029974655en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0029974655&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume238en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1en_HK
dc.identifier.epage27en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996UU20500001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBruzzone, R=7006793327en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhite, TW=35499703300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPaul, DL=7401667165en_HK

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