File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Electrical synapses: A dynamic signaling system that shapes the activity of neuronal networks

TitleElectrical synapses: A dynamic signaling system that shapes the activity of neuronal networks
Authors
KeywordsConnexin
Coupling
Gap junction
Neuron
Oscillation
Retina
Issue Date2004
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/bbamem
Citation
Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes, 2004, v. 1662 n. 1-2, p. 113-137 How to Cite?
AbstractGap junctions consist of intercellular channels dedicated to providing a direct pathway for ionic and biochemical communication between contacting cells. After an initial burst of publications describing electrical coupling in the brain, gap junctions progressively became less fashionable among neurobiologists, as the consensus was that this form of synaptic transmission would play a minimal role in shaping neuronal activity in higher vertebrates. Several new findings over the last decade (e.g. the implication of connexins in genetic diseases of the nervous system, in processing sensory information and in synchronizing the activity of neuronal networks) have brought gap junctions back into the spotlight. The appearance of gap junctional coupling in the nervous system is developmentally regulated, restricted to distinct cell types and persists after the establishment of chemical synapses, thus suggesting that this form of cell-cell signaling may be functionally interrelated with, rather than alternative to chemical transmission. This review focuses on gap junctions between neurons and summarizes the available data, derived from molecular, biological, electrophysiological, and genetic approaches, that are contributing to a new appreciation of their role in brain function. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132702
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.687
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.769
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHormuzdi, SGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFilippov, MAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMitropoulou, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMonyer, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBruzzone, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:28:23Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:28:23Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiochimica Et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes, 2004, v. 1662 n. 1-2, p. 113-137en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0005-2736en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132702-
dc.description.abstractGap junctions consist of intercellular channels dedicated to providing a direct pathway for ionic and biochemical communication between contacting cells. After an initial burst of publications describing electrical coupling in the brain, gap junctions progressively became less fashionable among neurobiologists, as the consensus was that this form of synaptic transmission would play a minimal role in shaping neuronal activity in higher vertebrates. Several new findings over the last decade (e.g. the implication of connexins in genetic diseases of the nervous system, in processing sensory information and in synchronizing the activity of neuronal networks) have brought gap junctions back into the spotlight. The appearance of gap junctional coupling in the nervous system is developmentally regulated, restricted to distinct cell types and persists after the establishment of chemical synapses, thus suggesting that this form of cell-cell signaling may be functionally interrelated with, rather than alternative to chemical transmission. This review focuses on gap junctions between neurons and summarizes the available data, derived from molecular, biological, electrophysiological, and genetic approaches, that are contributing to a new appreciation of their role in brain function. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/bbamemen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranesen_HK
dc.subjectConnexinen_HK
dc.subjectCouplingen_HK
dc.subjectGap junctionen_HK
dc.subjectNeuronen_HK
dc.subjectOscillationen_HK
dc.subjectRetinaen_HK
dc.titleElectrical synapses: A dynamic signaling system that shapes the activity of neuronal networksen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBruzzone, R: bruzzone@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBruzzone, R=rp01442en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbamem.2003.10.023en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15033583-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1642417540en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1642417540&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume1662en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage113en_HK
dc.identifier.epage137en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000220552000009-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHormuzdi, SG=6602198230en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFilippov, MA=8772857600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMitropoulou, G=8772857700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMonyer, H=35600652500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBruzzone, R=7006793327en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats