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Article: Application of the modified vaccination technique for the prevention and cure of chronic ailments

TitleApplication of the modified vaccination technique for the prevention and cure of chronic ailments
Authors
KeywordsAutoimmunity
Modified vaccination technique
Prophylactic
Therapeutic
Issue Date2010
Citation
Asian Pacific Journal Of Tropical Medicine, 2010, v. 3 n. 2, p. 160-166 How to Cite?
AbstractOver the years vaccination has proven to be the most successful health protection program for large populations, to prevent them from acquiring serious infectious and contagious diseases caused by exogenous antigens (ags) such as bacteria and viruses. Protection is generally achieved by an active immunization program, though passive immunization has also been employed, especially in the past, to combat diseases caused by certain bacterial infections (e.g. tetanus, diphtheria, etc.).Most recently, encouraging research data suggests that therapeutic approaches employing vaccination techniques can also be used to correct or deal with mishaps induced by or involving endogenous ags. However, most attempts at employing conventional vaccination techniques to do so have proven less than successful. In the case of cancer, one of the reasons for this is that the presentation of cancer related ags in presently available immunization frameworks is unable to evoke a powerful, specific cancer killing response. Therefore, drug treatments have been required in order to achieve additional beneficial effects.Recently, the Barabas group has developed a new vaccination technique (the third vaccination method, after active and passive immunization) called Modified Vaccination Technique (MVT). In experiments the MVT has been able to prevent-and with equal effectiveness, terminate-mishaps induced by or involving endogenous ags, e.g. in an experimental autoimmune kidney disease called slowly progressive Heymann nephritis (SPHN).The MVT is safe, and is able to initiate a specific immune response in the injected host (provided the injected components are in pure form). The MVT promises to provide the next generation of vaccines for the prevention, treatment, and termination of chronic disorders in humans, such as autoimmune diseases, cancer, and chronic infections. © 2010 Hainan Medical College.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132545
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.841
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.465
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBarabas, AZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCole, CDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBarabas, ADen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGraeff, RMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLafreniere, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorWeir, DMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:26:09Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:26:09Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAsian Pacific Journal Of Tropical Medicine, 2010, v. 3 n. 2, p. 160-166en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1995-7645en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132545-
dc.description.abstractOver the years vaccination has proven to be the most successful health protection program for large populations, to prevent them from acquiring serious infectious and contagious diseases caused by exogenous antigens (ags) such as bacteria and viruses. Protection is generally achieved by an active immunization program, though passive immunization has also been employed, especially in the past, to combat diseases caused by certain bacterial infections (e.g. tetanus, diphtheria, etc.).Most recently, encouraging research data suggests that therapeutic approaches employing vaccination techniques can also be used to correct or deal with mishaps induced by or involving endogenous ags. However, most attempts at employing conventional vaccination techniques to do so have proven less than successful. In the case of cancer, one of the reasons for this is that the presentation of cancer related ags in presently available immunization frameworks is unable to evoke a powerful, specific cancer killing response. Therefore, drug treatments have been required in order to achieve additional beneficial effects.Recently, the Barabas group has developed a new vaccination technique (the third vaccination method, after active and passive immunization) called Modified Vaccination Technique (MVT). In experiments the MVT has been able to prevent-and with equal effectiveness, terminate-mishaps induced by or involving endogenous ags, e.g. in an experimental autoimmune kidney disease called slowly progressive Heymann nephritis (SPHN).The MVT is safe, and is able to initiate a specific immune response in the injected host (provided the injected components are in pure form). The MVT promises to provide the next generation of vaccines for the prevention, treatment, and termination of chronic disorders in humans, such as autoimmune diseases, cancer, and chronic infections. © 2010 Hainan Medical College.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectAutoimmunityen_HK
dc.subjectModified vaccination techniqueen_HK
dc.subjectProphylacticen_HK
dc.subjectTherapeuticen_HK
dc.titleApplication of the modified vaccination technique for the prevention and cure of chronic ailmentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGraeff, RM: graeffr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGraeff, RM=rp01464en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1995-7645(10)60060-0en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77950680450en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77950680450&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage160en_HK
dc.identifier.epage166en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarabas, AZ=7005562572en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCole, CD=8942475100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarabas, AD=7005562583en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGraeff, RM=7003614053en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLafreniere, R=7006983863en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeir, DM=7202838101en_HK

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