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Article: Dendritic cells: Sentinels against pathogens
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TitleDendritic cells: Sentinels against pathogens
 
AuthorsChung, NPY1
Chen, Y1
Chan, VSF1
Tam, PKH1
Lin, CLS1
 
KeywordsSpecies Index: Human Immunodeficiency Virus
 
Issue Date2004
 
PublisherHistology and Histopathology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hh.um.es
 
CitationHistology And Histopathology, 2004, v. 19 n. 1, p. 317-324 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractDendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells, and are regarded as "natural adjuvants" for the induction of primary T or T-dependent immunity. DCs in the peripheral sites capture and process antigens. Encounter of exogenous or endogenous stimuli mature the function of DCs, and they thus acquire T-cell stimulatory capacity and distinct chemotactic behavior which enables them to migrate to lymphoid tissue. In the secondary lymphoid organs, they present antigens to T- and B-cells and stimulate their proliferation. Dendritic cells are also involved in tolerance induction, in particular, to self antigens. DCs also play a key role in the transmission of many pathogens, and therefore may become targets for designing new therapies. DCs have been manipulated in vitro and in vivo for cancer immunotherapy. In this article, we provide a concise overview of DC biology and its current and future role in clinical settings.
 
ISSN0213-3911
2013 Impact Factor: 2.236
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.107
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000188355400037
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChung, NPY
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, VSF
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, PKH
 
dc.contributor.authorLin, CLS
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:25:26Z
 
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:25:26Z
 
dc.date.issued2004
 
dc.description.abstractDendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells, and are regarded as "natural adjuvants" for the induction of primary T or T-dependent immunity. DCs in the peripheral sites capture and process antigens. Encounter of exogenous or endogenous stimuli mature the function of DCs, and they thus acquire T-cell stimulatory capacity and distinct chemotactic behavior which enables them to migrate to lymphoid tissue. In the secondary lymphoid organs, they present antigens to T- and B-cells and stimulate their proliferation. Dendritic cells are also involved in tolerance induction, in particular, to self antigens. DCs also play a key role in the transmission of many pathogens, and therefore may become targets for designing new therapies. DCs have been manipulated in vitro and in vivo for cancer immunotherapy. In this article, we provide a concise overview of DC biology and its current and future role in clinical settings.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationHistology And Histopathology, 2004, v. 19 n. 1, p. 317-324 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage324
 
dc.identifier.hkuros89125
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000188355400037
 
dc.identifier.issn0213-3911
2013 Impact Factor: 2.236
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.107
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid14702200
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1642515006
 
dc.identifier.spage317
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132498
 
dc.identifier.volume19
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherHistology and Histopathology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hh.um.es
 
dc.publisher.placeSpain
 
dc.relation.ispartofHistology and Histopathology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshAntigen Presentation
 
dc.subject.meshCell Division
 
dc.subject.meshCell Movement
 
dc.subject.meshDendritic Cells - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshImmune Tolerance
 
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapy
 
dc.subject.meshModels, Biological
 
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocytes - metabolism
 
dc.subjectSpecies Index: Human Immunodeficiency Virus
 
dc.titleDendritic cells: Sentinels against pathogens
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Lin, CLS</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong