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Article: The all-powerful and 'happy' drug: The use of steroids among primary care doctors in Hong Kong
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TitleThe all-powerful and 'happy' drug: The use of steroids among primary care doctors in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsWong, WCW2 1
You, JHS2
 
KeywordsHong Kong
Prescription
Primary care
Steroid
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
 
CitationJournal Of Clinical Pharmacy And Therapeutics, 2006, v. 31 n. 2, p. 173-178 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2710.2006.00721.x
 
AbstractBackground: Steroids are commonly used, but their prescribing pattern and factors associated with their use in the primary care setting are largely unknown. Methods: Using diagnosis and drug data obtained from logbooks submitted by participants in the Diploma in Family Medicine course between 1999 and 2004, we selected and analysed all patients with a prescription of steroid as well as conditions in which it was prescribed. Factors, relating to patients or doctors, which could be associated with steroid prescription were recorded for both the prescribed and the non-prescribed groups. The results were compared using chi-square tests. Results: Steroids were prescribed in 7·1% of all patient encounters, of which dermatological and respiratory diseases were the most two common conditions. Upper respiratory tract infections accounted for a third of all respiratory diseases in which steroid was prescribed. Female or 'minor' patients (OR 1·16, 95% CI 1·01-1·32 and 1·16, 1·00-1·36 respectively) were more likely to be given a steroid and younger doctors (1·52, 1·25-1·86) were more likely to prescribe them. Conclusion: Some patterns of poor prescribing practice were demonstrated in this study. Campaigns by professional bodies may improve prescribing among our community doctors and effective public education programmes are needed to modify the health beliefs and expectations of the general public. © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
 
ISSN0269-4727
2012 Impact Factor: 2.104
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.603
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2710.2006.00721.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000237472300009
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWong, WCW
 
dc.contributor.authorYou, JHS
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:24:38Z
 
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:24:38Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Steroids are commonly used, but their prescribing pattern and factors associated with their use in the primary care setting are largely unknown. Methods: Using diagnosis and drug data obtained from logbooks submitted by participants in the Diploma in Family Medicine course between 1999 and 2004, we selected and analysed all patients with a prescription of steroid as well as conditions in which it was prescribed. Factors, relating to patients or doctors, which could be associated with steroid prescription were recorded for both the prescribed and the non-prescribed groups. The results were compared using chi-square tests. Results: Steroids were prescribed in 7·1% of all patient encounters, of which dermatological and respiratory diseases were the most two common conditions. Upper respiratory tract infections accounted for a third of all respiratory diseases in which steroid was prescribed. Female or 'minor' patients (OR 1·16, 95% CI 1·01-1·32 and 1·16, 1·00-1·36 respectively) were more likely to be given a steroid and younger doctors (1·52, 1·25-1·86) were more likely to prescribe them. Conclusion: Some patterns of poor prescribing practice were demonstrated in this study. Campaigns by professional bodies may improve prescribing among our community doctors and effective public education programmes are needed to modify the health beliefs and expectations of the general public. © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Pharmacy And Therapeutics, 2006, v. 31 n. 2, p. 173-178 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2710.2006.00721.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike575580
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2710.2006.00721.x
 
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2710
 
dc.identifier.epage178
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237472300009
 
dc.identifier.issn0269-4727
2012 Impact Factor: 2.104
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.603
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid16635052
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645466644
 
dc.identifier.spage173
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132442
 
dc.identifier.volume31
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectHong Kong
 
dc.subjectPrescription
 
dc.subjectPrimary care
 
dc.subjectSteroid
 
dc.titleThe all-powerful and 'happy' drug: The use of steroids among primary care doctors in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Prince of Wales Hospital Hong Kong
  2. Chinese University of Hong Kong