File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Female street sex workers in Hong Kong: Moving beyond sexual health

TitleFemale street sex workers in Hong Kong: Moving beyond sexual health
Authors
KeywordsReferences (37) View In Table Layout
Issue Date2006
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/jwh
Citation
Journal Of Women's Health, 2006, v. 15 n. 4, p. 390-399 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: For many years, the sex industry in Hong Kong has appeared to be an integral and ever-expanding component of the city's sociocultural and economic structure. Accordingly, the physical and psychological health of sex workers is becoming an increasing concern for the workers themselves, the public, and government policy. Methods: A cross-sectional survey on the quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life [WHOQOL]) of female sex workers (FSWs) in Hong Kong was used to investigate the physical and psychological well-being of street FSWs, and the results were compared with those of nonsex-working Hong Kong women after adjusting for age, educational level, marital status, and health status. Results: The 89 FSWs surveyed scored significantly lower on QOL-WHOQOL-BREF (HK) - measures compared with the nonsex-working women. One common aspect among these sex workers was their negative view of themselves and of life. Many sex workers were at risk of being abused while at work, and many women worked without legal protection. Most of the women surveyed engaged in sex work to support their families. Because their income was often insufficient, some of their needs, especially those concerning health, were often neglected. Conclusions: The low WHOQOL-BREF (HK) scores in FSWs indicate feelings of helplessness and entrapment, which may well result in detrimental effects on sex workers' health, self-esteem, and confidence when asserting their basic rights, such as access to healthcare and safety. The conclusion highlights the vulnerability of this population to apparent weaknesses in Hong Kong's current healthcare system. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132440
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.032
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.242
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, WCWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHolroyd, EAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGray, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLing, DCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:24:37Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:24:37Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Women's Health, 2006, v. 15 n. 4, p. 390-399en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1540-9996en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132440-
dc.description.abstractBackground: For many years, the sex industry in Hong Kong has appeared to be an integral and ever-expanding component of the city's sociocultural and economic structure. Accordingly, the physical and psychological health of sex workers is becoming an increasing concern for the workers themselves, the public, and government policy. Methods: A cross-sectional survey on the quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life [WHOQOL]) of female sex workers (FSWs) in Hong Kong was used to investigate the physical and psychological well-being of street FSWs, and the results were compared with those of nonsex-working Hong Kong women after adjusting for age, educational level, marital status, and health status. Results: The 89 FSWs surveyed scored significantly lower on QOL-WHOQOL-BREF (HK) - measures compared with the nonsex-working women. One common aspect among these sex workers was their negative view of themselves and of life. Many sex workers were at risk of being abused while at work, and many women worked without legal protection. Most of the women surveyed engaged in sex work to support their families. Because their income was often insufficient, some of their needs, especially those concerning health, were often neglected. Conclusions: The low WHOQOL-BREF (HK) scores in FSWs indicate feelings of helplessness and entrapment, which may well result in detrimental effects on sex workers' health, self-esteem, and confidence when asserting their basic rights, such as access to healthcare and safety. The conclusion highlights the vulnerability of this population to apparent weaknesses in Hong Kong's current healthcare system. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/jwhen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Women's Healthen_HK
dc.subjectReferences (37) View In Table Layouten_US
dc.titleFemale street sex workers in Hong Kong: Moving beyond sexual healthen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, WCW:wongwcw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, WCW=rp01457en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/jwh.2006.15.390en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16724887-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33745116226en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33745116226&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume15en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage390en_HK
dc.identifier.epage399en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000238205800006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WCW=25230779000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHolroyd, EA=35609624800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGray, A=55118139700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLing, DC=8549709500en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats