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Article: Are Chinese men less susceptible to anxiety and depression?. A community-based cross-sectional survey from Hong Kong

TitleAre Chinese men less susceptible to anxiety and depression?. A community-based cross-sectional survey from Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsAnxiety
Chinese men
Depression
Susceptibility
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jmhg
Citation
Journal Of Men's Health And Gender, 2006, v. 3 n. 2, p. 152-159 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Many epidemiological data show that depression and anxiety are much more common in women than in men. Literature also reveals that men and women manage these issues differently. The aim of this study was to measure the role of gender in the frequency of symptoms, perception and health-seeking behaviours of unipolar affective disorders among the Chinese population in Hong Kong. Methods: 840 adults were conveniently sampled on the streets of five different districts in Hong Kong in 2004. The structured questionnaire had four sections including demographic data, anxio-depressive symptoms, knowledge about mood disorders and, medical-seeking and disclosure behaviours. Principal components analysis was applied to investigate the number of underlying factors associated with the symptoms and, the effects of gender and age on their occurrence. Results: Hong Kong Chinese men had reportedly fewer anxiety-related symptoms, but no such difference was observed in depressive symptoms. Fewer men admitted understanding of affective disorders or worried about having the disorder. Statistically significantly more men believed that they could get better without any help. The choices of therapists were different between men and women, and men were less likely to disclose to another person. Conclusions: The findings of this study highlight gender difference in clinical presentation and perception of affective disorders. Further research on the expression of symptomatology and the need to develop a more gender-sensitive diagnostic tool is recommended. © 2006 WPMH GmbH.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132439
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, WCWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWingKing, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorShun Tung, BLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:24:37Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:24:37Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Men's Health And Gender, 2006, v. 3 n. 2, p. 152-159en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1571-8913en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132439-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Many epidemiological data show that depression and anxiety are much more common in women than in men. Literature also reveals that men and women manage these issues differently. The aim of this study was to measure the role of gender in the frequency of symptoms, perception and health-seeking behaviours of unipolar affective disorders among the Chinese population in Hong Kong. Methods: 840 adults were conveniently sampled on the streets of five different districts in Hong Kong in 2004. The structured questionnaire had four sections including demographic data, anxio-depressive symptoms, knowledge about mood disorders and, medical-seeking and disclosure behaviours. Principal components analysis was applied to investigate the number of underlying factors associated with the symptoms and, the effects of gender and age on their occurrence. Results: Hong Kong Chinese men had reportedly fewer anxiety-related symptoms, but no such difference was observed in depressive symptoms. Fewer men admitted understanding of affective disorders or worried about having the disorder. Statistically significantly more men believed that they could get better without any help. The choices of therapists were different between men and women, and men were less likely to disclose to another person. Conclusions: The findings of this study highlight gender difference in clinical presentation and perception of affective disorders. Further research on the expression of symptomatology and the need to develop a more gender-sensitive diagnostic tool is recommended. © 2006 WPMH GmbH.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jmhgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Men's Health and Genderen_HK
dc.subjectAnxietyen_HK
dc.subjectChinese menen_HK
dc.subjectDepressionen_HK
dc.subjectSusceptibilityen_HK
dc.titleAre Chinese men less susceptible to anxiety and depression?. A community-based cross-sectional survey from Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, WCW:wongwcw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, WCW=rp01457en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jmhg.2006.01.014en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33744775648en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33744775648&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage152en_HK
dc.identifier.epage159en_HK
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WCW=25230779000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWingKing, L=13906699900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShun Tung, BL=13905598200en_HK

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