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Article: Pattern and determinants of Traditional Chinese Medicine use for upper respiratory tract infection among adults attending primary care clinics

TitlePattern and determinants of Traditional Chinese Medicine use for upper respiratory tract infection among adults attending primary care clinics
Authors
KeywordsHong Kong
Primary care
Traditional Chinese Medicine
Upper respiratory tract infection
Issue Date2007
PublisherHong Kong College of Family Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcfp.org.hk/
Citation
Hong Kong Practitioner, 2007, v. 29 n. 4, p. 134-144 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: (1) To explore the pattern of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) use for Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (URTI); and, (2) to identify the determinants associated with such health-seeking behaviours. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Subjects: Adults (aged 18-59) attending the three designated primary care clinics from February 2006 to April 2006. A total of 399 questionnaires were distributed; 381 (95.5%) valid for analysis. Main outcome measures: Demographic data; details of reported URTI episodes; TCM used for the reported URTI episodes. Independent variables were tested by binary logistic regression. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted for variables with p<0.05 to determine possible independent predictors of TCM use in treating URTI. Results: 38.1% of all respondents tried at least 1 type of TCM during URTI episode. A quarter used western medicine and TCM either simultaneously (11.3%) or in the recovery stage of their illness (11.8%). Age and satisfaction scores for western medicine and TCM were shown to be independent predictors associated with TCM use in treating URTI. Conclusion: Use of TCM to treat URTI among adults attending private clinic is common especially among older patients. All general practitioners should be aware as a significant portion of TCM use happens while people are taking prescribed medications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132432
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, TKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, WCWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Nen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:24:34Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:24:34Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Practitioner, 2007, v. 29 n. 4, p. 134-144en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1027-3948en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132432-
dc.description.abstractObjective: (1) To explore the pattern of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) use for Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (URTI); and, (2) to identify the determinants associated with such health-seeking behaviours. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Subjects: Adults (aged 18-59) attending the three designated primary care clinics from February 2006 to April 2006. A total of 399 questionnaires were distributed; 381 (95.5%) valid for analysis. Main outcome measures: Demographic data; details of reported URTI episodes; TCM used for the reported URTI episodes. Independent variables were tested by binary logistic regression. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted for variables with p<0.05 to determine possible independent predictors of TCM use in treating URTI. Results: 38.1% of all respondents tried at least 1 type of TCM during URTI episode. A quarter used western medicine and TCM either simultaneously (11.3%) or in the recovery stage of their illness (11.8%). Age and satisfaction scores for western medicine and TCM were shown to be independent predictors associated with TCM use in treating URTI. Conclusion: Use of TCM to treat URTI among adults attending private clinic is common especially among older patients. All general practitioners should be aware as a significant portion of TCM use happens while people are taking prescribed medications.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong College of Family Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcfp.org.hk/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Practitioneren_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectPrimary careen_HK
dc.subjectTraditional Chinese Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectUpper respiratory tract infectionen_HK
dc.titlePattern and determinants of Traditional Chinese Medicine use for upper respiratory tract infection among adults attending primary care clinicsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, WCW:wongwcw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, WCW=rp01457en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34250619626en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34250619626&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage134en_HK
dc.identifier.epage144en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, TK=8589050900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WCW=25230779000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRobinson, N=7201402374en_HK

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