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Article: Prevalence and determinants of child maltreatment among high school students in Southern China: A large scale school based survey

TitlePrevalence and determinants of child maltreatment among high school students in Southern China: A large scale school based survey
Authors
KeywordsAcademic Achievement
Adolescent
Age
Article
Child Abuse
China
Clinical Assessment Tool
Education
Female
Gender
Health Practitioner
Health Survey
High School Student
Housing
Human
Male
Mental Disease
Parental Behavior
Physical Disease
Prevalence
Priority Journal
Punishment
Random Sample
Sexual Abuse
Taboo
Teacher
Issue Date2008
Citation
Child And Adolescent Psychiatry And Mental Health, 2008, v. 2 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Child maltreatment can cause significant physical and psychological problems. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence and determinants of child maltreatment in Guangzhou, China, where such issues are often considered a taboo subject. Methods: A school-based survey was conducted in southern China in 2005. 24 high schools were selected using stratified random sampling strategy based on their districts and bandings. The self-administered validated Chinese version of parent-child Conflict Tactics Scale (CTSPC) was used as the main assessment tool to measure the abusive experiences encountered by students in the previous six months. Results: The response rate of this survey was 99.7%. Among the 6592 responding students, the mean age was 14.68. Prevalence of parental psychological aggression, corporal punishment, severe and very serve physical maltreatment in the past 6 months were 78.3%, 23.2%, 15.1% and 2.8% respectively. The prevalence of sexual abuse is 0.6%. The most commonly cited reasons for maltreatment included 'disobedience to parents', 'poor academic performance', and 'quarrelling between parents'. Age, parental education, places of origins and types of housing were found to be associated with physical maltreatments whereas gender and fathers' education level were associated with sexual abuse. Conclusion: Though largely unspoken, child maltreatment is a common problem in China. Identification of significant determinants in this study can provide valuable information for teachers and health professionals so as to pay special attention to those at-risk children. © 2008 Leung et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132424
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.134
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.250
PubMed Central ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, PWSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, WCWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, WQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, CSKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:24:30Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:24:30Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChild And Adolescent Psychiatry And Mental Health, 2008, v. 2en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1753-2000en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132424-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Child maltreatment can cause significant physical and psychological problems. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence and determinants of child maltreatment in Guangzhou, China, where such issues are often considered a taboo subject. Methods: A school-based survey was conducted in southern China in 2005. 24 high schools were selected using stratified random sampling strategy based on their districts and bandings. The self-administered validated Chinese version of parent-child Conflict Tactics Scale (CTSPC) was used as the main assessment tool to measure the abusive experiences encountered by students in the previous six months. Results: The response rate of this survey was 99.7%. Among the 6592 responding students, the mean age was 14.68. Prevalence of parental psychological aggression, corporal punishment, severe and very serve physical maltreatment in the past 6 months were 78.3%, 23.2%, 15.1% and 2.8% respectively. The prevalence of sexual abuse is 0.6%. The most commonly cited reasons for maltreatment included 'disobedience to parents', 'poor academic performance', and 'quarrelling between parents'. Age, parental education, places of origins and types of housing were found to be associated with physical maltreatments whereas gender and fathers' education level were associated with sexual abuse. Conclusion: Though largely unspoken, child maltreatment is a common problem in China. Identification of significant determinants in this study can provide valuable information for teachers and health professionals so as to pay special attention to those at-risk children. © 2008 Leung et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofChild and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Healthen_HK
dc.subjectAcademic Achievementen_US
dc.subjectAdolescenten_US
dc.subjectAgeen_US
dc.subjectArticleen_US
dc.subjectChild Abuseen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectClinical Assessment Toolen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectGenderen_US
dc.subjectHealth Practitioneren_US
dc.subjectHealth Surveyen_US
dc.subjectHigh School Studenten_US
dc.subjectHousingen_US
dc.subjectHumanen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectMental Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectParental Behavioren_US
dc.subjectPhysical Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectPrevalenceen_US
dc.subjectPriority Journalen_US
dc.subjectPunishmenten_US
dc.subjectRandom Sampleen_US
dc.subjectSexual Abuseen_US
dc.subjectTabooen_US
dc.subjectTeacheren_US
dc.titlePrevalence and determinants of child maltreatment among high school students in Southern China: A large scale school based surveyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, WCW:wongwcw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, WCW=rp01457en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1753-2000-2-27en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18823544-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2565657-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-53949117359en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-53949117359&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume2en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, PWS=36873078100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WCW=25230779000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, WQ=7409639706en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, CSK=7404394105en_HK

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