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Article: Individual, familial and community determinants of child physical abuse among high-school students in China

TitleIndividual, familial and community determinants of child physical abuse among high-school students in China
Authors
KeywordsAge
Child abuse
China
Migration
Socioeconomic status (SES)
Issue Date2009
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimed
Citation
Social Science And Medicine, 2009, v. 68 n. 10, p. 1819-1825 How to Cite?
AbstractWhile many risk factors for child physical abuse are known, little research exists examining these in multilevel contexts including both individual and environmental influences. The authors examined the roles of individual-, family- and community-level factors such as socioeconomic status (SES) in determining the likelihood of child physical abuse in Guangzhou, China. Twenty-four schools were recruited by stratified random sampling, with 6628 junior high-school students aged 13-16 years participating. Parental child physical abuse experience, together with family and community levels of SES among students were measured and their relationships were investigated by applying univariable, multivariable and multilevel logistic regression models. Univariable, multivariable and multilevel logistic regression models were applied. Six-month prevalence of minor, severe and very severe assaults were 23.2%, 15.1% and 2.8%, respectively. A U-shaped association between family SES and likelihood of severe assaults was identified. In the multilevel model, indicators of low family SES, mother's higher occupational and educational status remained significantly independent predictors of physical abuse. Internal migration status was associated with higher risk as was younger age. The authors suggest that previous categories of risk factors for physical abuse may be too simplistic, and that further research on social and environmental influences may usefully inform intervention programs. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132419
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.814
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.894
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, WCWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, WQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGoggins, WBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, CSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, PWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:24:27Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:24:27Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSocial Science And Medicine, 2009, v. 68 n. 10, p. 1819-1825en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132419-
dc.description.abstractWhile many risk factors for child physical abuse are known, little research exists examining these in multilevel contexts including both individual and environmental influences. The authors examined the roles of individual-, family- and community-level factors such as socioeconomic status (SES) in determining the likelihood of child physical abuse in Guangzhou, China. Twenty-four schools were recruited by stratified random sampling, with 6628 junior high-school students aged 13-16 years participating. Parental child physical abuse experience, together with family and community levels of SES among students were measured and their relationships were investigated by applying univariable, multivariable and multilevel logistic regression models. Univariable, multivariable and multilevel logistic regression models were applied. Six-month prevalence of minor, severe and very severe assaults were 23.2%, 15.1% and 2.8%, respectively. A U-shaped association between family SES and likelihood of severe assaults was identified. In the multilevel model, indicators of low family SES, mother's higher occupational and educational status remained significantly independent predictors of physical abuse. Internal migration status was associated with higher risk as was younger age. The authors suggest that previous categories of risk factors for physical abuse may be too simplistic, and that further research on social and environmental influences may usefully inform intervention programs. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimeden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Science and Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectAgeen_HK
dc.subjectChild abuseen_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectMigrationen_HK
dc.subjectSocioeconomic status (SES)en_HK
dc.titleIndividual, familial and community determinants of child physical abuse among high-school students in Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, WCW:wongwcw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, WCW=rp01457en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.03.001en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19344989-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65349092372en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-65349092372&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume68en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1819en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1825en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000266520200011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WCW=25230779000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, WQ=23495405600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGoggins, WB=6701315434en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, CS=7404394105en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, PW=15769574300en_HK

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