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Article: Iron speciation and iron species transformation in activated sludge membrane bioreactors

TitleIron speciation and iron species transformation in activated sludge membrane bioreactors
Authors
KeywordsBiogeochemistry
Biological treatment
Hydrogen peroxide
Iron uptake
Reductase
Superoxide
Issue Date2010
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/watres
Citation
Water Research, 2010, v. 44 n. 11, p. 3511-3521 How to Cite?
AbstractIron speciation and iron species transformation were investigated in three membrane bioreactors (MBRs) differing in feed iron concentration (and oxidation state) and the presence or absence of an anoxic chamber to simulate various feed stream conditions and operational configurations. The concentration of dissolved Fe(II) was below detection limit (i.e., <0.1μM) in all chambers while the concentration of dissolved Fe(III) was found to be around 0.25μM. H2O2 was detected as a quasi-stable reactive oxygen species with concentrations in the μM range in all MBR chambers. H2O2 acted as the primary potential oxidant of Fe(II) in the anoxic chamber. Batch experiments showed that the rate constant for oxygenation of dissolved Fe(II) in the liquid phase of the activated sludge compartment was as high as 78M-1s-1. The half-life time of dissolved Fe(II) in all chambers was found to be no longer than 1min. The stability constants of the Fe(III)SMP complexes were far from uniform. A large quantity of Fe(II) (over 0.036% of the sludge dry mass) was found to be adsorbed by the bacterial flocs suggesting the active reduction of adsorbed Fe(III). The content of adsorbed Fe(II) was found to increase if the MBR was supplied with iron in the Fe(II) form. Over 60% of iron fed to the reactors was converted to highly insoluble ferric oxyhydroxide in all MBRs. A model has been developed which satisfactorily describes the oxidation of Fe(II) in the activated sludge liquid phase and which provides valuable insight into the relative importance of redox processes occurring which mediate the speciation of iron in the system. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132396
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.991
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.772
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Australian Research CouncilDP0665515
LP100100056
Funding Information:

Funding provided by the Australian Research Council through ARC Discovery grants DP0665515 and LP100100056 are gratefully acknowledged.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, XMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWaite, TDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:24:06Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:24:06Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationWater Research, 2010, v. 44 n. 11, p. 3511-3521en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0043-1354en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132396-
dc.description.abstractIron speciation and iron species transformation were investigated in three membrane bioreactors (MBRs) differing in feed iron concentration (and oxidation state) and the presence or absence of an anoxic chamber to simulate various feed stream conditions and operational configurations. The concentration of dissolved Fe(II) was below detection limit (i.e., <0.1μM) in all chambers while the concentration of dissolved Fe(III) was found to be around 0.25μM. H2O2 was detected as a quasi-stable reactive oxygen species with concentrations in the μM range in all MBR chambers. H2O2 acted as the primary potential oxidant of Fe(II) in the anoxic chamber. Batch experiments showed that the rate constant for oxygenation of dissolved Fe(II) in the liquid phase of the activated sludge compartment was as high as 78M-1s-1. The half-life time of dissolved Fe(II) in all chambers was found to be no longer than 1min. The stability constants of the Fe(III)SMP complexes were far from uniform. A large quantity of Fe(II) (over 0.036% of the sludge dry mass) was found to be adsorbed by the bacterial flocs suggesting the active reduction of adsorbed Fe(III). The content of adsorbed Fe(II) was found to increase if the MBR was supplied with iron in the Fe(II) form. Over 60% of iron fed to the reactors was converted to highly insoluble ferric oxyhydroxide in all MBRs. A model has been developed which satisfactorily describes the oxidation of Fe(II) in the activated sludge liquid phase and which provides valuable insight into the relative importance of redox processes occurring which mediate the speciation of iron in the system. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/watresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWater Researchen_HK
dc.subjectBiogeochemistryen_HK
dc.subjectBiological treatmenten_HK
dc.subjectHydrogen peroxideen_HK
dc.subjectIron uptakeen_HK
dc.subjectReductaseen_HK
dc.subjectSuperoxideen_HK
dc.titleIron speciation and iron species transformation in activated sludge membrane bioreactorsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, XM: wangxm@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, XM=rp01452en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2010.03.031en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20399481-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953022189en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953022189&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume44en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage3511en_HK
dc.identifier.epage3521en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278985500021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, XM=23092524200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWaite, TD=7004869232en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6959908-

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