File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Developing an Intuitive Understanding of Conservation and Contamination: Invisible Particles as a Plausible Mechanism

TitleDeveloping an Intuitive Understanding of Conservation and Contamination: Invisible Particles as a Plausible Mechanism
Authors
Issue Date1993
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/dev.html
Citation
Developmental Psychology, 1993, v. 29 n. 2, p. 286-299 How to Cite?
AbstractFour studies examined whether 3- to 7-year-olds appreciate that a substance can continue to exist and maintain its inherent properties (e.g., taste, having weight) even after it has become invisible upon dissolution. These studies also examined whether young children have the concept of "tiny, invisible particles," and if so, whether they can use it to reason about material kinds. These studies revealed that, by age 3, some children could appreciate both conservation of matter despite visual disappearance and the existence of tiny, invisible particles. Moreover, they could make use of the particle concept to come up with a plausible mechanism for how a substance can continue to exist and maintain its inherent properties despite visual disappearance upon dissolution. The proportion of children who could do so increases with age. Such abilities can play an important role in the development of an intuitive theory of material kinds and in the acquisition of scientific concepts and theories in chemistry.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132027
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.116
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.585

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, TKfen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSidle, ALen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRollins, KBen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-07T06:40:21Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-07T06:40:21Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDevelopmental Psychology, 1993, v. 29 n. 2, p. 286-299en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0012-1649en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132027-
dc.description.abstractFour studies examined whether 3- to 7-year-olds appreciate that a substance can continue to exist and maintain its inherent properties (e.g., taste, having weight) even after it has become invisible upon dissolution. These studies also examined whether young children have the concept of "tiny, invisible particles," and if so, whether they can use it to reason about material kinds. These studies revealed that, by age 3, some children could appreciate both conservation of matter despite visual disappearance and the existence of tiny, invisible particles. Moreover, they could make use of the particle concept to come up with a plausible mechanism for how a substance can continue to exist and maintain its inherent properties despite visual disappearance upon dissolution. The proportion of children who could do so increases with age. Such abilities can play an important role in the development of an intuitive theory of material kinds and in the acquisition of scientific concepts and theories in chemistry.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/dev.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopmental Psychologyen_HK
dc.titleDeveloping an Intuitive Understanding of Conservation and Contamination: Invisible Particles as a Plausible Mechanismen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAu, TKf:terryau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAu, TKf=rp00580en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-21144462256en_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage286en_HK
dc.identifier.epage299en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu, TKf=9435174900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSidle, AL=25933393400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRollins, KB=25933415600en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats