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Article: Acquiring word meanings via linguistic contrast

TitleAcquiring word meanings via linguistic contrast
Authors
Issue Date1987
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cogdev
Citation
Cognitive Development, 1987, v. 2 n. 3, p. 217-236 How to Cite?
AbstractWords are generally related in meaning and can often be organized into semantic domains. One way children may learn that two words belong to the same semantic domain is to hear the words used contrastively. This work examines the circumstances in which hearing a new word contrasted with familiar words from the same semantic domain may help young children induce the new word meaning. Some 3- and 4-year-olds were introduced to a novel color name or material name and heard it contrasted with familiar words; some heard the novel word used for referring to an object but received no explicit contrastive information; and some did not hear the novel word used at all prior to testing. All children were then given a variety of tests to determine what they had learned about the novel word. The results were that explicit linguistic contrast helped only in some situations. Children seemed to prefer material to color in hypothesizing about a new word meaning. Linguistic contrast helped children when it was consistent with this preference, but not when it was inconsistent. Thus, it helped children map a material name, but not a color name, onto the appropriate semantic domain. © 1987 Ablex Publishing Corporation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132024
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.571
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.232
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, TKfen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMarkman, EMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-07T06:26:09Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-07T06:26:09Z-
dc.date.issued1987en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCognitive Development, 1987, v. 2 n. 3, p. 217-236en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0885-2014en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132024-
dc.description.abstractWords are generally related in meaning and can often be organized into semantic domains. One way children may learn that two words belong to the same semantic domain is to hear the words used contrastively. This work examines the circumstances in which hearing a new word contrasted with familiar words from the same semantic domain may help young children induce the new word meaning. Some 3- and 4-year-olds were introduced to a novel color name or material name and heard it contrasted with familiar words; some heard the novel word used for referring to an object but received no explicit contrastive information; and some did not hear the novel word used at all prior to testing. All children were then given a variety of tests to determine what they had learned about the novel word. The results were that explicit linguistic contrast helped only in some situations. Children seemed to prefer material to color in hypothesizing about a new word meaning. Linguistic contrast helped children when it was consistent with this preference, but not when it was inconsistent. Thus, it helped children map a material name, but not a color name, onto the appropriate semantic domain. © 1987 Ablex Publishing Corporation.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cogdeven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCognitive Developmenten_HK
dc.titleAcquiring word meanings via linguistic contrasten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAu, TKf:terryau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAu, TKf=rp00580en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0885-2014(87)90059-1-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38249036861en_HK
dc.identifier.volume2en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage217en_HK
dc.identifier.epage236en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1987K663700003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu, TKf=9435174900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarkman, EM=6603875896en_HK

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