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Article: A verb is worth a thousand words: The causes and consequences of interpersonal events implicit in language

TitleA verb is worth a thousand words: The causes and consequences of interpersonal events implicit in language
Authors
Issue Date1986
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jml
Citation
Journal Of Memory And Language, 1986, v. 25 n. 1, p. 104-122 How to Cite?
AbstractThis research examines people's sensitivity to the causes and consequences of events implicit in interpersonal verbs. In Study 1, adults consistently attributed the cause of an action to the Agent for some action verbs (e.g., telephone), and to the Patient for others (e.g., thank). They consistently attributed the cause of an experience to the Stimulus rather than to the Experiencer for experiential verbs (e.g., amaze, admire). Also, the consequences of interpersonal events were often judged to affect the Patient or Experiencer rather than the Agent or Stimulus. Study 2 showed that adults were sensitive to the causality implicit in interpersonal verbs even when they had not been explicitly asked to infer about the causes of the depicted events. In the last study, preschoolers were also sensitive to the implicit causality in interpersonal verbs, and their causal schemas were quite adult-like. © 1986.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132007
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.218
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.403
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, TKfen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-04T06:48:21Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-04T06:48:21Z-
dc.date.issued1986en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Memory And Language, 1986, v. 25 n. 1, p. 104-122en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0749-596Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132007-
dc.description.abstractThis research examines people's sensitivity to the causes and consequences of events implicit in interpersonal verbs. In Study 1, adults consistently attributed the cause of an action to the Agent for some action verbs (e.g., telephone), and to the Patient for others (e.g., thank). They consistently attributed the cause of an experience to the Stimulus rather than to the Experiencer for experiential verbs (e.g., amaze, admire). Also, the consequences of interpersonal events were often judged to affect the Patient or Experiencer rather than the Agent or Stimulus. Study 2 showed that adults were sensitive to the causality implicit in interpersonal verbs even when they had not been explicitly asked to infer about the causes of the depicted events. In the last study, preschoolers were also sensitive to the implicit causality in interpersonal verbs, and their causal schemas were quite adult-like. © 1986.en_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Memory and Languageen_HK
dc.titleA verb is worth a thousand words: The causes and consequences of interpersonal events implicit in languageen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAu, TKf:terryau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAu, TKf=rp00580en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0749-596X(86)90024-0-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0001303654en_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage104en_HK
dc.identifier.epage122en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1986A203100007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu, TKf=9435174900en_HK

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