File Download
  • No File Attached
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: What it means to be a “model minority”: Voices of ethnic Koreans in Northeast China
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleWhat it means to be a “model minority”: Voices of ethnic Koreans in Northeast China
 
AuthorsGao, F1
 
KeywordsCultural superiority
Dual economic marginalization
Educational aspirations
Model minority
Social hierarchy
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14631369.asp
 
CitationAsian Ethnicity, 2008, v. 9 n. 1, p. 55-67 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14631360701803252
 
AbstractEthnic Koreans in China have been widely recognized as a 'model minority' primarily for academic success. Using the data collected as part of a larger ethnographic research on Korean elementary school students, this paper examines how 27 Korean families construct meaning out of the model minority stereotype in the context of their lived experience in Northeast China. Research results indicate that Koreans constructed the multi-faceted nature of 'model minority' as a matter of cultural superiority and dual economic marginalization in the Chinese and South Korean mainstream societies, and valued education as a practical means to achieve economic upward mobility into the Chinese mainstream. This paper argues that the model minority stereotype with the cultural explanations for Korean success may reinforce the cultural deficiency argument about the academic failure of 'backward' minorities, silence the disadvantages suffered by Koreans in China's reform period and lead to no active intervention to remedy them.
 
ISSN1463-1369
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.125
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14631360701803252
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorGao, F
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:56:28Z
 
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:56:28Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstractEthnic Koreans in China have been widely recognized as a 'model minority' primarily for academic success. Using the data collected as part of a larger ethnographic research on Korean elementary school students, this paper examines how 27 Korean families construct meaning out of the model minority stereotype in the context of their lived experience in Northeast China. Research results indicate that Koreans constructed the multi-faceted nature of 'model minority' as a matter of cultural superiority and dual economic marginalization in the Chinese and South Korean mainstream societies, and valued education as a practical means to achieve economic upward mobility into the Chinese mainstream. This paper argues that the model minority stereotype with the cultural explanations for Korean success may reinforce the cultural deficiency argument about the academic failure of 'backward' minorities, silence the disadvantages suffered by Koreans in China's reform period and lead to no active intervention to remedy them.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAsian Ethnicity, 2008, v. 9 n. 1, p. 55-67 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14631360701803252
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14631360701803252
 
dc.identifier.epage67
 
dc.identifier.hkuros178358
 
dc.identifier.issn1463-1369
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.125
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-57749122878
 
dc.identifier.spage55
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130555
 
dc.identifier.volume9
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14631369.asp
 
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Ethnicity
 
dc.rightsThis is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article
 
dc.subjectCultural superiority
 
dc.subjectDual economic marginalization
 
dc.subjectEducational aspirations
 
dc.subjectModel minority
 
dc.subjectSocial hierarchy
 
dc.titleWhat it means to be a “model minority”: Voices of ethnic Koreans in Northeast China
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Gao, F</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2010-12-23T08:56:28Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2010-12-23T08:56:28Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2008</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Asian Ethnicity, 2008, v. 9 n. 1, p. 55-67</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1463-1369</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/130555</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Ethnic Koreans in China have been widely recognized as a &apos;model minority&apos; primarily for academic success. Using the data collected as part of a larger ethnographic research on Korean elementary school students, this paper examines how 27 Korean families construct meaning out of the model minority stereotype in the context of their lived experience in Northeast China. Research results indicate that Koreans constructed the multi-faceted nature of &apos;model minority&apos; as a matter of cultural superiority and dual economic marginalization in the Chinese and South Korean mainstream societies, and valued education as a practical means to achieve economic upward mobility into the Chinese mainstream. This paper argues that the model minority stereotype with the cultural explanations for Korean success may reinforce the cultural deficiency argument about the academic failure of &apos;backward&apos; minorities, silence the disadvantages suffered by Koreans in China&apos;s reform period and lead to no active intervention to remedy them.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Routledge. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14631369.asp</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Asian Ethnicity</relation.ispartof>
<rights>This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article</rights>
<subject>Cultural superiority</subject>
<subject>Dual economic marginalization</subject>
<subject>Educational aspirations</subject>
<subject>Model minority</subject>
<subject>Social hierarchy</subject>
<title>What it means to be a &#8220;model minority&#8221;: Voices of ethnic Koreans in Northeast China</title>
<type>Article</type>
<identifier.openurl>http://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&amp;issn=1463-1369&amp;volume=9&amp;issue=1&amp;spage=55&amp;epage=67&amp;date=2008&amp;atitle=What+it+means+to+be+a+&#8220;model+minority&#8221;:+Voices+of+ethnic+Koreans+in+Northeast+China</identifier.openurl>
<description.nature>Link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1080/14631360701803252</identifier.doi>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-57749122878</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>178358</identifier.hkuros>
<identifier.volume>9</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>1</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>55</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>67</identifier.epage>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong