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Conference Paper: Transnational politics and poetics in the revival of Chinese death rituals

TitleTransnational politics and poetics in the revival of Chinese death rituals
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong.
Citation
International Symposium on the Politics and Poetics of Asian Intangible Cultural Heritage, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 16-17 October 2009. How to Cite?
AbstractReligions and religious rituals are being increasingly proclaimed as Intangible Cultural Heritages by UNESCO. Chinese death rituals can thus been conceptualised as significant intangible cultural heritages within the Chinese societies, both within Mainland China and the Chinese Diaspora. Since the Open Door Policy in 1978, there has been a revival of death rituals within the villages of South China. This revival has led to the emergence of the death rituals that have not seen practiced in Mainland China since pre-Cultural Revolution days. This paper argues that the preservation and the practice of death rituals in modern China and the Chinese Diaspora are significant intangible cultural heritages because of their role in informing a group of its identity and in helping with identity construction within these societies. Here, these rituals have re-cemented lost kinship ties among the Chinese villagers within the village setting, between the Chinese villagers and their urban kin in China, and between these two groups and their kin residing in the Diaspora. By coming together and recreating an environment where different groups of individuals participate in the death rituals and pay respects to common ancestors, we are witnessing a rediscovery and reconfiguration of kinship ties and social relationships on the one hand, and, at the same time, a surfacing of tensions and conflicts on the other. In this sense, death rituals, as a complex system of intangible cultural heritages, enables us to understand the dynamics of modern kinship ties and social relationships in contemporary Chinese societies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130287

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKuah-Pearce, KEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:49:00Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:49:00Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Symposium on the Politics and Poetics of Asian Intangible Cultural Heritage, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 16-17 October 2009.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130287-
dc.description.abstractReligions and religious rituals are being increasingly proclaimed as Intangible Cultural Heritages by UNESCO. Chinese death rituals can thus been conceptualised as significant intangible cultural heritages within the Chinese societies, both within Mainland China and the Chinese Diaspora. Since the Open Door Policy in 1978, there has been a revival of death rituals within the villages of South China. This revival has led to the emergence of the death rituals that have not seen practiced in Mainland China since pre-Cultural Revolution days. This paper argues that the preservation and the practice of death rituals in modern China and the Chinese Diaspora are significant intangible cultural heritages because of their role in informing a group of its identity and in helping with identity construction within these societies. Here, these rituals have re-cemented lost kinship ties among the Chinese villagers within the village setting, between the Chinese villagers and their urban kin in China, and between these two groups and their kin residing in the Diaspora. By coming together and recreating an environment where different groups of individuals participate in the death rituals and pay respects to common ancestors, we are witnessing a rediscovery and reconfiguration of kinship ties and social relationships on the one hand, and, at the same time, a surfacing of tensions and conflicts on the other. In this sense, death rituals, as a complex system of intangible cultural heritages, enables us to understand the dynamics of modern kinship ties and social relationships in contemporary Chinese societies.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong.-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Symposium on the Politics and Poetics of Asian Intangible Cultural Heritage-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleTransnational politics and poetics in the revival of Chinese death ritualsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailKuah-Pearce, KE: kekuah@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKuah-Pearce, KE=rp00567en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros178546en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-
dc.description.otherInternational Symposium on the Politics and Poetics of Asian Intangible Cultural Heritage, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 16-17 October 2009.-

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