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Article: Utilization of emergency room and hospitalization by chinese nursing home residents: A cross-sectional study
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TitleUtilization of emergency room and hospitalization by chinese nursing home residents: A cross-sectional study
 
AuthorsTang, M3
Woo, J3
Hui, E3
Chan, F2
Lee, J3
Sham, A3
Chau, PH1
 
KeywordsChinese
Emergency room
Hospitalization
Nursing home
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jmda
 
CitationJournal Of The American Medical Directors Association, 2010, v. 11 n. 5, p. 325-332 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2009.10.003
 
AbstractObjectives: This study determined factors associated with increased use of emergency room (ER) and hospitalization of Chinese nursing home residents. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: The setting was 14 nursing homes in Hong Kong. Participants: Participants were 1820 Chinese nursing home residents. Measurements: Data on facility factors and resident factors were collected. Resident factors were mainly collected by the Minimum Data Set-Resident Assessment Instrument 2.0 (MDS-RAI 2.0). Results: Residing in a for-profit home (OR=6.51), having less than one third of time spent in activities (OR=1.84), having had recent fall (OR=3.81), having renal failure (OR=3.17), having had recent initiation of new medications (OR=1.42), and having had recent physician visit (OR=1.67) were factors associated with increased use of ER. Male gender (OR=1.49), having a body mass index (BMI) less than 18.5kg/m2 (OR=1.51), being more functionally dependent (OR=1.18 per 1-point increment in the ADL Hierarchy Scale), having higher burden of illness (OR=1.29 per 1-point increment in the CHESS score), having a feeding tube (OR=3.07), having an indwelling urinary catheter (OR=2.75), having had recent fall (OR=1.94), having respiratory tract infection (OR=2.05), having Parkinson's disease (OR=1.55), having anemia (OR=1.70), having had recent initiation of new medications (OR=2.08), and having had recent physician visit (OR=1.83) were factors associated with increased risk of hospitalization. Conclusions: Although some of the associated factors reflect frailty characteristics of residents, differences in association between for-profit and not-for-profit institutions provide evidence of overreliance on the ER, perhaps as a result of inadequate primary care support. © 2010 American Medical Directors Association.
 
ISSN1525-8610
2013 Impact Factor: 4.781
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.229
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2009.10.003
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000279028200007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
S. K. Yee Medical Foundation
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the S. K. Yee Medical Foundation.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTang, M
 
dc.contributor.authorWoo, J
 
dc.contributor.authorHui, E
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, F
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, J
 
dc.contributor.authorSham, A
 
dc.contributor.authorChau, PH
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:46:38Z
 
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:46:38Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This study determined factors associated with increased use of emergency room (ER) and hospitalization of Chinese nursing home residents. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: The setting was 14 nursing homes in Hong Kong. Participants: Participants were 1820 Chinese nursing home residents. Measurements: Data on facility factors and resident factors were collected. Resident factors were mainly collected by the Minimum Data Set-Resident Assessment Instrument 2.0 (MDS-RAI 2.0). Results: Residing in a for-profit home (OR=6.51), having less than one third of time spent in activities (OR=1.84), having had recent fall (OR=3.81), having renal failure (OR=3.17), having had recent initiation of new medications (OR=1.42), and having had recent physician visit (OR=1.67) were factors associated with increased use of ER. Male gender (OR=1.49), having a body mass index (BMI) less than 18.5kg/m2 (OR=1.51), being more functionally dependent (OR=1.18 per 1-point increment in the ADL Hierarchy Scale), having higher burden of illness (OR=1.29 per 1-point increment in the CHESS score), having a feeding tube (OR=3.07), having an indwelling urinary catheter (OR=2.75), having had recent fall (OR=1.94), having respiratory tract infection (OR=2.05), having Parkinson's disease (OR=1.55), having anemia (OR=1.70), having had recent initiation of new medications (OR=2.08), and having had recent physician visit (OR=1.83) were factors associated with increased risk of hospitalization. Conclusions: Although some of the associated factors reflect frailty characteristics of residents, differences in association between for-profit and not-for-profit institutions provide evidence of overreliance on the ER, perhaps as a result of inadequate primary care support. © 2010 American Medical Directors Association.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Medical Directors Association, 2010, v. 11 n. 5, p. 325-332 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2009.10.003
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2009.10.003
 
dc.identifier.epage332
 
dc.identifier.hkuros177122
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279028200007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
S. K. Yee Medical Foundation
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the S. K. Yee Medical Foundation.

 
dc.identifier.issn1525-8610
2013 Impact Factor: 4.781
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.229
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.pmid20511099
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953349001
 
dc.identifier.spage325
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130082
 
dc.identifier.volume11
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jmda
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectChinese
 
dc.subjectEmergency room
 
dc.subjectHospitalization
 
dc.subjectNursing home
 
dc.titleUtilization of emergency room and hospitalization by chinese nursing home residents: A cross-sectional study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Woo, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hui, E</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, F</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lee, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Sham, A</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chau, PH</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Fung Yiu King Hospital
  3. Chinese University of Hong Kong