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Article: Effects of increased salinity and an introduced predator on lowland amphibians in Southern China: Species identity matters

TitleEffects of increased salinity and an introduced predator on lowland amphibians in Southern China: Species identity matters
Authors
KeywordsAmphibian
China
Freshwater wetlands
Gambusia
Lowland habitats
Mosquitofish
Salinization
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/biocon
Citation
Biological Conservation, 2010, v. 143 n. 5, p. 1079-1086 How to Cite?
AbstractApproximately 30% of amphibian species are threatened due to a variety of factors affecting their habitats and physiology, yet contributions that interactions among factors make to population declines are not well-explored. Two factors, introduced mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) and increased salinity, may coincide in lowland habitats used by breeding amphibians. Mosquitofish have been introduced worldwide and can be significant predators of amphibian larvae. Salinization of wetlands is an increasing problem globally due to (1) application of road deicing salts in temperate regions, (2) irrigation practices associated with intensive agriculture, and (3) saltwater intrusion due to sea-level rise. We investigated the effects of mosquitofish (G. affinis) and increasing salinity on five species of lowland wetland-breeding amphibians from southern China. We exposed anuran hatchlings to four salinity levels and two fish treatments and all combinations of the two factors in a series of experiments. Four of the species were susceptible to predation by mosquitofish, two were sensitive to increased salinity at concentrations >6% seawater, and one was tolerant of both increased salinity and mosquitofish. We found no interaction between the predator and increased salinity. Salinization and mosquitofish represent significant threats to lowland amphibians in this region and, coupled with the ongoing loss and degradation of lowland wetlands, portend a bleak future for lowland amphibian populations in the region. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130014
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.985
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.593
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKarraker, NEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorArrigoni, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:45:36Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:45:36Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiological Conservation, 2010, v. 143 n. 5, p. 1079-1086en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130014-
dc.description.abstractApproximately 30% of amphibian species are threatened due to a variety of factors affecting their habitats and physiology, yet contributions that interactions among factors make to population declines are not well-explored. Two factors, introduced mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) and increased salinity, may coincide in lowland habitats used by breeding amphibians. Mosquitofish have been introduced worldwide and can be significant predators of amphibian larvae. Salinization of wetlands is an increasing problem globally due to (1) application of road deicing salts in temperate regions, (2) irrigation practices associated with intensive agriculture, and (3) saltwater intrusion due to sea-level rise. We investigated the effects of mosquitofish (G. affinis) and increasing salinity on five species of lowland wetland-breeding amphibians from southern China. We exposed anuran hatchlings to four salinity levels and two fish treatments and all combinations of the two factors in a series of experiments. Four of the species were susceptible to predation by mosquitofish, two were sensitive to increased salinity at concentrations >6% seawater, and one was tolerant of both increased salinity and mosquitofish. We found no interaction between the predator and increased salinity. Salinization and mosquitofish represent significant threats to lowland amphibians in this region and, coupled with the ongoing loss and degradation of lowland wetlands, portend a bleak future for lowland amphibian populations in the region. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/bioconen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Conservationen_HK
dc.subjectAmphibianen_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectFreshwater wetlandsen_HK
dc.subjectGambusiaen_HK
dc.subjectLowland habitatsen_HK
dc.subjectMosquitofishen_HK
dc.subjectSalinizationen_HK
dc.titleEffects of increased salinity and an introduced predator on lowland amphibians in Southern China: Species identity mattersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarraker, NE: karraker@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarraker, NE=rp00714en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biocon.2010.01.020en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951023141en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros177658en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros178284-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951023141&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume143en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1079en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1086en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278427700007-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarraker, NE=8708421900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridArrigoni, J=36016038100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6775428-

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