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Conference Paper: Serum levels of IL-33 and soluble ST2 and their association with disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus

TitleSerum levels of IL-33 and soluble ST2 and their association with disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Issue Date2010
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk
Citation
The 15th Medical Research Conference (15th MRC), Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 16 January 2010. In Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2010, v. 16 n. 1 suppl. 1, p. 46, abstract no. 76 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: IL-33 has recently been found to be the specific ligand of ST2, an IL-1 receptor family member that is selectively expressed on Th2 cells and mediates Th2 response. This study aimed to measure serum levels of soluble form of ST2 (sST2) and IL-33 in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to examine its association with disease activity. METHODS: Seventy SLE patients were evaluated for disease activity determined by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), serological features (anti-dsDNA antibody, C3 and C4) and 57 patients were evaluated longitudinally on a second occasion. IL-33 and sST2 were measured by sandwich ELISA in the 127 SLE serum samples and compared to 28 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. RESULTS: Serum sST2 level was significantly higher in SLE patients with active disease (0.51+0.18 ng/mL) compared to those with inactive disease (0.42+0.08 ng/mL) [P=0.006] and to normal controls (0.36+0.13 ng/mL) [P<0.001]. sST2 level correlated significantly and positively with SLEDAI, level of anti-dsDNA antibody and prednisolone dosage and negatively with C3 and remained significantly predictive of active disease after adjustment for prednisolone use in logistic regression analysis (odds ratio=4.6, P=0.01). sST2 level was sensitive to change in disease activity in longitudinal evaluation and not influenced by age, gender, and renal function. Elevated serum IL-33 was comparable in frequency (4.3% vs 7.1%, P=0.62) and levels (P=0.53) between SLE patients and controls. CONCLUSION: Elevated serum sST2 level in SLE patients was found to correlate with disease activity and was sensitive to change, suggesting a potential role as surrogate marker of disease activity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129834
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, MYen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, FPen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, WKen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, FYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, EYTen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:42:46Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:42:46Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 15th Medical Research Conference (15th MRC), Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 16 January 2010. In Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2010, v. 16 n. 1 suppl. 1, p. 46, abstract no. 76en_US
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129834-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: IL-33 has recently been found to be the specific ligand of ST2, an IL-1 receptor family member that is selectively expressed on Th2 cells and mediates Th2 response. This study aimed to measure serum levels of soluble form of ST2 (sST2) and IL-33 in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to examine its association with disease activity. METHODS: Seventy SLE patients were evaluated for disease activity determined by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), serological features (anti-dsDNA antibody, C3 and C4) and 57 patients were evaluated longitudinally on a second occasion. IL-33 and sST2 were measured by sandwich ELISA in the 127 SLE serum samples and compared to 28 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. RESULTS: Serum sST2 level was significantly higher in SLE patients with active disease (0.51+0.18 ng/mL) compared to those with inactive disease (0.42+0.08 ng/mL) [P=0.006] and to normal controls (0.36+0.13 ng/mL) [P<0.001]. sST2 level correlated significantly and positively with SLEDAI, level of anti-dsDNA antibody and prednisolone dosage and negatively with C3 and remained significantly predictive of active disease after adjustment for prednisolone use in logistic regression analysis (odds ratio=4.6, P=0.01). sST2 level was sensitive to change in disease activity in longitudinal evaluation and not influenced by age, gender, and renal function. Elevated serum IL-33 was comparable in frequency (4.3% vs 7.1%, P=0.62) and levels (P=0.53) between SLE patients and controls. CONCLUSION: Elevated serum sST2 level in SLE patients was found to correlate with disease activity and was sensitive to change, suggesting a potential role as surrogate marker of disease activity.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journalen_US
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.titleSerum levels of IL-33 and soluble ST2 and their association with disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosusen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailMok, MY: temy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, FP: fphuang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, WK: ipwaiki@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, EYT: eytchan@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMok, MY=rp00490en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros177405en_US
dc.identifier.volume16en_US
dc.identifier.issue1 suppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage46, abstract no. 76en_US
dc.identifier.epage46, abstract no. 76-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-
dc.description.otherThe 15th Medical Research Conference (15th MRC), Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 16 January 2010. In Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2010, v. 16 n. 1, suppl. 1, p. 46, abstract no. 76-

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