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Article: Understanding sociohistorical imprint on cancer risk by age-period-cohort decomposition in Hong Kong

TitleUnderstanding sociohistorical imprint on cancer risk by age-period-cohort decomposition in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2010, v. 64 n. 7, p. 596-603 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Research on trends in cancer incidence has usually examined single sites in populations that long ago completed the economic transition. The trends in 11 cancers in three groups in the recently transitioned Hong Kong Chinese population were examined to delineate the effects of economic transition and provide generalised aetiological insights. Methods Sex-specific Poisson models were fitted to cancer incidence in Hong Kong (1974e2003) to examine age, period and birth cohort effects. Cancers were grouped as: hormonally modulated (including breast, endometrium, ovary and prostate), infection-related (cervix, liver, nasopharynx, lymphoma and stomach) and lifestyle-related (colorectum and lung). Results Age-standardised incidence of hormonally modulated female cancers increased for the first generation (women born ∼ 1940) to experience puberty in the transitioning environment of Hong Kong. Prostate cancer incidence increased, despite a downturn for the first generation growing up in Hong Kong. Incidence of infection-related cancers decreased, mainly due to birth cohort effects; coinciding with birth for liver cancer and lymphoma, with reaching adulthood for cervical and male nasopharyngeal cancers, and with a generation for stomach cancer. Lifestyle-related cancers had sex-specific declines by birth cohort. Conclusion With economic transition and the associated lifestyle changes, environmentally determined levels of pubertal female hormones may drive intergenerational increases in hormonally related female cancers. Economic development, via improved living conditions, may also reduce infection-related cancers, possibly including prostate cancer; however, the effects depend on transmission dynamics and perhaps specific public health initiatives. In traditional societies, males may benefit from economic development sooner than females.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129488
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, IOLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, SCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMang, OWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:37:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:37:53Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2010, v. 64 n. 7, p. 596-603en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0143-005Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129488-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Research on trends in cancer incidence has usually examined single sites in populations that long ago completed the economic transition. The trends in 11 cancers in three groups in the recently transitioned Hong Kong Chinese population were examined to delineate the effects of economic transition and provide generalised aetiological insights. Methods Sex-specific Poisson models were fitted to cancer incidence in Hong Kong (1974e2003) to examine age, period and birth cohort effects. Cancers were grouped as: hormonally modulated (including breast, endometrium, ovary and prostate), infection-related (cervix, liver, nasopharynx, lymphoma and stomach) and lifestyle-related (colorectum and lung). Results Age-standardised incidence of hormonally modulated female cancers increased for the first generation (women born ∼ 1940) to experience puberty in the transitioning environment of Hong Kong. Prostate cancer incidence increased, despite a downturn for the first generation growing up in Hong Kong. Incidence of infection-related cancers decreased, mainly due to birth cohort effects; coinciding with birth for liver cancer and lymphoma, with reaching adulthood for cervical and male nasopharyngeal cancers, and with a generation for stomach cancer. Lifestyle-related cancers had sex-specific declines by birth cohort. Conclusion With economic transition and the associated lifestyle changes, environmentally determined levels of pubertal female hormones may drive intergenerational increases in hormonally related female cancers. Economic development, via improved living conditions, may also reduce infection-related cancers, possibly including prostate cancer; however, the effects depend on transmission dynamics and perhaps specific public health initiatives. In traditional societies, males may benefit from economic development sooner than females.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleUnderstanding sociohistorical imprint on cancer risk by age-period-cohort decomposition in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0143-005X&volume=64&issue=7&spage=596&epage=603&date=2010&atitle=Understanding+sociohistorical+imprint+on+cancer+risk+by+age-period-cohort+decomposition+in+Hong+Kong-
dc.identifier.emailWong, IOL: iolwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, IOL=rp01806en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2008.080788en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19710042-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955615002en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros177656en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955615002&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume64en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage596en_HK
dc.identifier.epage603en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278712900009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, IOL=7102513940en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, SCK=36017041900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMang, OWK=6603963663en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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