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Article: Daily visibility and mortality: Assessment of health benefits from improved visibility in Hong Kong

TitleDaily visibility and mortality: Assessment of health benefits from improved visibility in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envres
Citation
Environmental Research, 2010, v. 110 n. 6, p. 617-623 How to Cite?
AbstractVisibility in Hong Kong has deteriorated significantly over 40 years with visibility below 8. km in the absence of fog, mist, or precipitation, increasing from 6.6 days in 1968 to 54.1 days in 2007. We assessed the short-term mortality effects of daily loss of visibility. During 1996-2006, we obtained mortality data for non-accidental and cardiorespiratory causes, visibility recorded as visual range in kilometers, temperature, and relative humidity from an urban observatory, and concentrations of four criteria pollutants. A generalized additive Poisson regression model with penalized cubic regression splines was fitted to control for time variant covariates. For non-accidental mortality, an interquartile range (IQR) of 6.5. km decrease in visibility at lag. 0-1 days was associated with an excess risk (ER%) [95% CI] of 1.13 [0.49, 1.76] for all ages and 1.37 [0.65, 2.09] for ages 65 years and over; for cardiovascular mortality of 1.31 [0.13, 2.49] for all ages, and 1.72 [0.44, 3.00] for ages 65 years and over; and for respiratory mortality of 1.92 [0.49, 3.35] for all ages and 1.76 [0.28, 3.25] for ages 65 years and over. The estimated ER% for daily mortality derived from both visibility and air pollutant data were comparable in terms of magnitude, lag pattern, and exposure-response relationships especially when using particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤10γm to predict the mortality associated with visibility. Visibility provides a useful proxy for the assessment of environmental health risks from ambient air pollutants and a valid approach for the assessment of the public health impacts of air pollution and the benefits of air quality improvement measures in developing countries where pollutant monitoring data are scarce. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129474
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.088
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.452
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThach, TQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChau, YKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, YNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOu, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:37:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:37:47Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Research, 2010, v. 110 n. 6, p. 617-623en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0013-9351en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129474-
dc.description.abstractVisibility in Hong Kong has deteriorated significantly over 40 years with visibility below 8. km in the absence of fog, mist, or precipitation, increasing from 6.6 days in 1968 to 54.1 days in 2007. We assessed the short-term mortality effects of daily loss of visibility. During 1996-2006, we obtained mortality data for non-accidental and cardiorespiratory causes, visibility recorded as visual range in kilometers, temperature, and relative humidity from an urban observatory, and concentrations of four criteria pollutants. A generalized additive Poisson regression model with penalized cubic regression splines was fitted to control for time variant covariates. For non-accidental mortality, an interquartile range (IQR) of 6.5. km decrease in visibility at lag. 0-1 days was associated with an excess risk (ER%) [95% CI] of 1.13 [0.49, 1.76] for all ages and 1.37 [0.65, 2.09] for ages 65 years and over; for cardiovascular mortality of 1.31 [0.13, 2.49] for all ages, and 1.72 [0.44, 3.00] for ages 65 years and over; and for respiratory mortality of 1.92 [0.49, 3.35] for all ages and 1.76 [0.28, 3.25] for ages 65 years and over. The estimated ER% for daily mortality derived from both visibility and air pollutant data were comparable in terms of magnitude, lag pattern, and exposure-response relationships especially when using particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤10γm to predict the mortality associated with visibility. Visibility provides a useful proxy for the assessment of environmental health risks from ambient air pollutants and a valid approach for the assessment of the public health impacts of air pollution and the benefits of air quality improvement measures in developing countries where pollutant monitoring data are scarce. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Researchen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshAtmosphere - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoringen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_HK
dc.subject.meshLung Diseases - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshObservationen_HK
dc.subject.meshParticulate Matter - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_HK
dc.titleDaily visibility and mortality: Assessment of health benefits from improved visibility in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailThach, TQ:thach@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM:hrmrwcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityThach, TQ=rp00450en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envres.2010.05.005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20627276-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954851371en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros177039en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954851371&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume110en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage617en_HK
dc.identifier.epage623en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000280571600012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThach, TQ=6602850066en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KP=27171298000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, YK=16300609300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, YN=36082532500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOu, CQ=14070561800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, L=35729908300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7264404-

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