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Article: Situational awareness and health protective responses to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Hong Kong: A cross-sectional study

TitleSituational awareness and health protective responses to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Hong Kong: A cross-sectional study
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2010, v. 5 n. 10, article no. 13350 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Whether information sources influence health protective behaviours during influenza pandemics or other emerging infectious disease epidemics is uncertain. Methodology: Data from cross-sectional telephone interviews of 1,001 Hong Kong adults in June, 2009 were tested against theory and data-derived hypothesized associations between trust in (formal/informal) information, understanding, self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility and worry, and hand hygiene and social distancing using Structural Equation Modelling with multigroup comparisons. Principal Findings: Trust in formal (government/media) information about influenza was associated with greater reported understanding of A/H1N1 cause (β = 0.36) and A/H1N1 prevention self-efficacy (β = 0.25), which in turn were associated with more hand hygiene (β = 0.19 and β = 0.23, respectively). Trust in informal (interpersonal) information was negatively associated with perceived personal A/H1N1 susceptibility (β =20.21), which was negatively associated with perceived self-efficacy (β =20.42) but positively associated with influenza worry (β = 0.44). Trust in informal information was positively associated with influenza worry (β = 0.16) which was in turn associated with greater social distancing (β = 0.36). Multigroup comparisons showed gender differences regarding paths from trust in formal information to understanding of A/H1N1 cause, trust in informal information to understanding of A/H1N1 cause, and understanding of A/H1N1 cause to perceived self-efficacy. Conclusions/Significance: Trust in government/media information was more strongly associated with greater self-efficacy and handwashing, whereas trust in informal information was strongly associated with perceived health threat and avoidance behaviour. Risk communication should consider the effect of gender differences. © 2010 Liao et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129462
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau, Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative RegionPHE-01
Harvard Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics, United States National Institutes of Health (NIH)1 U54 GM088558
Area of Excellence Scheme of the Hong Kong University Grants CommitteeAoE/M-12/06
Funding Information:

This work received financial support from the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau, Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) (grant number PHE-01), the Harvard Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics from the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study program (grant number 1 U54 GM088558), and the Area of Excellence Scheme of the Hong Kong University Grants Committee (grant number AoE/M-12/06). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

References
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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, WTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, MWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:37:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:37:39Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2010, v. 5 n. 10, article no. 13350en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129462-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Whether information sources influence health protective behaviours during influenza pandemics or other emerging infectious disease epidemics is uncertain. Methodology: Data from cross-sectional telephone interviews of 1,001 Hong Kong adults in June, 2009 were tested against theory and data-derived hypothesized associations between trust in (formal/informal) information, understanding, self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility and worry, and hand hygiene and social distancing using Structural Equation Modelling with multigroup comparisons. Principal Findings: Trust in formal (government/media) information about influenza was associated with greater reported understanding of A/H1N1 cause (β = 0.36) and A/H1N1 prevention self-efficacy (β = 0.25), which in turn were associated with more hand hygiene (β = 0.19 and β = 0.23, respectively). Trust in informal (interpersonal) information was negatively associated with perceived personal A/H1N1 susceptibility (β =20.21), which was negatively associated with perceived self-efficacy (β =20.42) but positively associated with influenza worry (β = 0.44). Trust in informal information was positively associated with influenza worry (β = 0.16) which was in turn associated with greater social distancing (β = 0.36). Multigroup comparisons showed gender differences regarding paths from trust in formal information to understanding of A/H1N1 cause, trust in informal information to understanding of A/H1N1 cause, and understanding of A/H1N1 cause to perceived self-efficacy. Conclusions/Significance: Trust in government/media information was more strongly associated with greater self-efficacy and handwashing, whereas trust in informal information was strongly associated with perceived health threat and avoidance behaviour. Risk communication should consider the effect of gender differences. © 2010 Liao et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAwareness-
dc.subject.meshBehavior Therapy-
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation and purification-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention and control - virology-
dc.titleSituational awareness and health protective responses to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Hong Kong: A cross-sectional studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1932-6203&volume=5&issue=10, article no. e13350&spage=&epage=&date=2010&atitle=Situational+awareness+and+health+protective+responses+to+pandemic+influenza+A+(H1N1)+in+Hong+Kong:+a+cross-sectional+study-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, B:bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, WT:wwtlam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, B=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WT=rp00443en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0013350en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20967280-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2953514-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78149426530en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros183417en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros184202-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78149426530&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282807300028-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiao, Q=26029481600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, B=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, WT=7203022022en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, MW=9238285000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK

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