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Article: Does the age of achieving pubertal landmarks predict cognition in older men? Guangzhou biobank cohort study

TitleDoes the age of achieving pubertal landmarks predict cognition in older men? Guangzhou biobank cohort study
Authors
KeywordsCognition
Epidemiology
Puberty
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidem
Citation
Annals Of Epidemiology, 2010, v. 20 n. 12, p. 948-954 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Earlier pubertal maturation in women may be associated with better cognition. It is unclear whether or not this also occurs in men. We tested the hypothesis that earlier pubertal development in men was associated with better cognition in later adulthood in a developing Chinese population. Methods: Multivariable linear regression was used in cross-sectional study of 2463 older, Chinese men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Mean pubertal age was calculated as the mean of recalled ages of first nocturnal emission, voice breaking and pubarche. We assessed the association of mean pubertal age with delayed 10-word recall and mini-mental state examination (MMSE) scores. Results: Adjusted for age and education, 1 year earlier mean pubertal age was associated with higher delayed 10-word recall (0.06 [95% confidence interval = 0.02-0.10]) and higher MMSE (0.08 [0.03-0.13]) scores. Additional adjustment for childhood and adulthood socio-economic position, sitting height, and leg length did not change the results. Conclusions: These preliminary findings suggest earlier maturation in men is associated with better cognitive function in later adulthood. Whether pubertal timing is a marker of earlier life exposures or reflects a biological relation between somatrophic and/or gonadotrophic hormones and cognitive development is unclear. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129459
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.335
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.439
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, Hong Kong
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
Funding Information:

We thank R. Peto and Z.M. Chen of the Clinical Trial Service Unit, The University of Oxford for their support. The Guangzhou Cohort Study investigators include: Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital: X.Q. Lao, W.S. Zhang, M. Cao, T. Zhu, B. Liu, C.Q. Jiang (Co-PI); The University of Hong Kong: C.M. Schooling, S.M. McGhee, G.M. Leung, R.F. Fielding, T.H. Lam (Co-PI); The University of Birmingham: P. Adab, G.N. Thomas, Y. Peng, K.K. Cheng (Co-PI). This work was supported by the University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, Hong Kong; the University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China; and the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHeys, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:37:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:37:37Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Epidemiology, 2010, v. 20 n. 12, p. 948-954en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1047-2797en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129459-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Earlier pubertal maturation in women may be associated with better cognition. It is unclear whether or not this also occurs in men. We tested the hypothesis that earlier pubertal development in men was associated with better cognition in later adulthood in a developing Chinese population. Methods: Multivariable linear regression was used in cross-sectional study of 2463 older, Chinese men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Mean pubertal age was calculated as the mean of recalled ages of first nocturnal emission, voice breaking and pubarche. We assessed the association of mean pubertal age with delayed 10-word recall and mini-mental state examination (MMSE) scores. Results: Adjusted for age and education, 1 year earlier mean pubertal age was associated with higher delayed 10-word recall (0.06 [95% confidence interval = 0.02-0.10]) and higher MMSE (0.08 [0.03-0.13]) scores. Additional adjustment for childhood and adulthood socio-economic position, sitting height, and leg length did not change the results. Conclusions: These preliminary findings suggest earlier maturation in men is associated with better cognitive function in later adulthood. Whether pubertal timing is a marker of earlier life exposures or reflects a biological relation between somatrophic and/or gonadotrophic hormones and cognitive development is unclear. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidemen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectCognitionen_HK
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectPubertyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Development - physiology-
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance-
dc.subject.meshChild Development - physiology-
dc.subject.meshCognition - physiology-
dc.subject.meshPuberty - physiology-
dc.titleDoes the age of achieving pubertal landmarks predict cognition in older men? Guangzhou biobank cohort studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHeys, M: m_heys@lycos.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHeys, M=rp00257en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.annepidem.2010.06.011en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20727786-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78149463269en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros183420en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78149463269&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage948en_HK
dc.identifier.epage954en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284669000010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeys, M=22234232400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, C=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, W=14833531400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7817718-

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