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Article: China’s Religious Danwei: Institutionalising Religion in the People’s Republic

TitleChina’s Religious Danwei: Institutionalising Religion in the People’s Republic
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherCentre d'Etudes Francais sur la Chine Contemporaine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cefc.com.hk/rubrique.php?id=17
Citation
China Perspectives, 2009, v. 4, p. 17-30 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article is a study of the continuities and changes in the state-led institutionalisation of religion in the PRC from 1979 to 2009 and their effects on the structuring of China’s religious field. A normative discourse on religion is constituted by a network of Party leaders, officials, academics, and religious leaders. Official religious institutions have become hybrids of religious culture with the institutional habitus of work units ( danwei) in the socialist market economy. A wide range of religious practices have found legitimacy under secular labels such as health, science, culture, tourism, or heritage. Religious affairs authorities have begun to acknowledge the existence of this expanding realm of religious life, and to accord discursive legitimacy to the previously stigmatised or ignored categories of popular religion and new religions, but hesitate to propose an explicit change in policy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129364
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.241

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, DAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:36:12Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:36:12Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationChina Perspectives, 2009, v. 4, p. 17-30en_US
dc.identifier.issn2070-3449-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129364-
dc.description.abstractThis article is a study of the continuities and changes in the state-led institutionalisation of religion in the PRC from 1979 to 2009 and their effects on the structuring of China’s religious field. A normative discourse on religion is constituted by a network of Party leaders, officials, academics, and religious leaders. Official religious institutions have become hybrids of religious culture with the institutional habitus of work units ( danwei) in the socialist market economy. A wide range of religious practices have found legitimacy under secular labels such as health, science, culture, tourism, or heritage. Religious affairs authorities have begun to acknowledge the existence of this expanding realm of religious life, and to accord discursive legitimacy to the previously stigmatised or ignored categories of popular religion and new religions, but hesitate to propose an explicit change in policy.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCentre d'Etudes Francais sur la Chine Contemporaine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cefc.com.hk/rubrique.php?id=17-
dc.relation.ispartofChina Perspectivesen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleChina’s Religious Danwei: Institutionalising Religion in the People’s Republicen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPalmer, DA: palmer19@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPalmer, DA=rp00654en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros177984en_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.spage17-
dc.identifier.epage30-
dc.identifier.eissn1011-2006-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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