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Article: What does recovery from schizophrenia mean? Perceptions of medical students and trainee psychiatrists

TitleWhat does recovery from schizophrenia mean? Perceptions of medical students and trainee psychiatrists
Authors
Keywordsattitude change
medical education
psychiatrists
recovery
schizophrenia
stigma
Issue Date2011
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105597
Citation
International Journal Of Social Psychiatry, 2011, v. 57 n. 3, p. 248-262 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The attitudes of medical professionals towards recovery from schizophrenia are key in defining the therapeutic encounter and may change as they move through their medical career. Method: A qualitative methodology was used based on three focus groups of medical students and trainee psychiatrists in Hong Kong. Both held pessimistic attitudes towards recovery in schizophrenia. Four major categories and one central theme emerged, with little difference between students and doctors. The four categories were: (1) recovery is defined by the cessation of medication and the resumption of normal psychosocial functioning; (2) formal recovery requires medical confirmation plus the patient's admission of illness; (3) recovery should be discussed, but largely in terms of the contribution of drug compliance; and (4) participants recognized that stigma was an impediment to recovery while holding attitudes that were as unaccepting towards people with schizophrenia as lay people's. Conclusions: Traditional medical education over-emphasizes symptomatic recovery and ignores the need for a more flexible construction of the concept. Professional knowledge must incorporate both quantitative and qualitative data and inculcate humanitarian concern through active contact with users, and acceptance of the legitimacy of their expert experience. Medical education should seek effective ways to change entrenched negative attitudes in students about schizophrenia and the possibility of recovery. Further large-scale research should be carried out to establish attitudes of medical professionals towards recovery from schizophrenia and how this changes during typical career trajectories. This information could then be used to devise effective means within medical education to combat stigma and change attitudes. © The Author(s), 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129355
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.488
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, RMKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPearson, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, EEYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, CWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:35:52Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:35:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Social Psychiatry, 2011, v. 57 n. 3, p. 248-262en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0020-7640en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129355-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The attitudes of medical professionals towards recovery from schizophrenia are key in defining the therapeutic encounter and may change as they move through their medical career. Method: A qualitative methodology was used based on three focus groups of medical students and trainee psychiatrists in Hong Kong. Both held pessimistic attitudes towards recovery in schizophrenia. Four major categories and one central theme emerged, with little difference between students and doctors. The four categories were: (1) recovery is defined by the cessation of medication and the resumption of normal psychosocial functioning; (2) formal recovery requires medical confirmation plus the patient's admission of illness; (3) recovery should be discussed, but largely in terms of the contribution of drug compliance; and (4) participants recognized that stigma was an impediment to recovery while holding attitudes that were as unaccepting towards people with schizophrenia as lay people's. Conclusions: Traditional medical education over-emphasizes symptomatic recovery and ignores the need for a more flexible construction of the concept. Professional knowledge must incorporate both quantitative and qualitative data and inculcate humanitarian concern through active contact with users, and acceptance of the legitimacy of their expert experience. Medical education should seek effective ways to change entrenched negative attitudes in students about schizophrenia and the possibility of recovery. Further large-scale research should be carried out to establish attitudes of medical professionals towards recovery from schizophrenia and how this changes during typical career trajectories. This information could then be used to devise effective means within medical education to combat stigma and change attitudes. © The Author(s), 2010.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105597en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Social Psychiatryen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry. Copyright © Sage Publications Ltd.-
dc.subjectattitude changeen_HK
dc.subjectmedical educationen_HK
dc.subjectpsychiatristsen_HK
dc.subjectrecoveryen_HK
dc.subjectschizophreniaen_HK
dc.subjectstigmaen_HK
dc.titleWhat does recovery from schizophrenia mean? Perceptions of medical students and trainee psychiatristsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0020-7640&volume=57&issue=3&spage=248&epage=262&date=2010&atitle=What+does+recovery+from+schizophrenia+mean?+Perceptions+of+medical+students+and+trainee+psychiatrists-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EEY: eyhchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EEY=rp00392en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0020764009354833en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20068021-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79956161735en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros177446en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79956161735&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume57en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage248en_HK
dc.identifier.epage262en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290434500004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, RMK=7102153803en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPearson, V=7005541425en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, EEY=7402315729en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, CW=8627115600en_HK

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