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Article: Schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings share increased resting-state connectivity in the task-negative network but not its anticorrelated task-positive network
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TitleSchizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings share increased resting-state connectivity in the task-negative network but not its anticorrelated task-positive network
 
AuthorsLiu, H1 6
Kaneko, Y4
Ouyang, X1
Li, L1
Hao, Y1
Chen, EYH2
Jiang, T3
Zhou, Y5 3
Liu, Z1
 
KeywordsSchizophrenia
Unaffected sibling
Default mode network
Functional connectivity
Resting-state
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/
 
CitationSchizophrenia Bulletin, 2012, v. 38 n. 2, p. 285-294 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbq074
 
AbstractBackground: Abnormal connectivity of the anticorrelated intrinsic networks, the task-negative network (TNN), and the task-positive network (TPN) is implicated in schizophrenia. Comparisons between schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings enable further understanding of illness susceptibility and pathophysiology. We examined the resting-state connectivity differences in the intrinsic networks between schizophrenic patients, their unaffected siblings, and healthy controls. Methods: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance images were obtained from 25 individuals in each subject group. The posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were used as seed regions to identify the TNN and TPN through functional connectivity analysis. Interregional connectivity strengths were analyzed using overlapped intrinsic networks composed of regions common to all subject groups. Results: Schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings showed increased connectivity in the TNN between the bilateral inferior temporal gyri. By contrast, schizophrenic patients alone demonstrated increased connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and left inferior temporal gyrus and between the ventral medial prefrontal cortex and right lateral parietal cortex in the TNN. Schizophrenic patients exhibited increased connectivity between the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right inferior frontal gyrus in the TPN relative to their unaffected siblings, though this trend only approached statistical significance in comparison to healthy controls. Conclusion: Resting-state hyperconnectivity of the intrinsic networks may disrupt network coordination and thereby contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Similar, though milder, hyperconnectivity of the TNN in unaffected siblings of schizophrenic patients may contribute to the identification of schizophrenia endophenotypes and ultimately to the determination of schizophrenia risk genes.
 
ISSN0586-7614
2012 Impact Factor: 8.486
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.691
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbq074
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3283150
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000300731100016
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China30670752
30900487
National Basic Research Program of China2006CB500808
2007CB512300
11th Five Year Key Program for Science and Technology Development of China2007BAI17B05
Funding Information:

National Natural Science Foundation of China (30670752 to Z.L. and 30900487 to Y.Z.); National Basic Research Program of China (2006CB500808, 2007CB512300); 11th Five Year Key Program for Science and Technology Development of China (2007BAI17B05).

 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLiu, H
 
dc.contributor.authorKaneko, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorOuyang, X
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, L
 
dc.contributor.authorHao, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, T
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Z
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:35:51Z
 
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:35:51Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Abnormal connectivity of the anticorrelated intrinsic networks, the task-negative network (TNN), and the task-positive network (TPN) is implicated in schizophrenia. Comparisons between schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings enable further understanding of illness susceptibility and pathophysiology. We examined the resting-state connectivity differences in the intrinsic networks between schizophrenic patients, their unaffected siblings, and healthy controls. Methods: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance images were obtained from 25 individuals in each subject group. The posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were used as seed regions to identify the TNN and TPN through functional connectivity analysis. Interregional connectivity strengths were analyzed using overlapped intrinsic networks composed of regions common to all subject groups. Results: Schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings showed increased connectivity in the TNN between the bilateral inferior temporal gyri. By contrast, schizophrenic patients alone demonstrated increased connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and left inferior temporal gyrus and between the ventral medial prefrontal cortex and right lateral parietal cortex in the TNN. Schizophrenic patients exhibited increased connectivity between the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right inferior frontal gyrus in the TPN relative to their unaffected siblings, though this trend only approached statistical significance in comparison to healthy controls. Conclusion: Resting-state hyperconnectivity of the intrinsic networks may disrupt network coordination and thereby contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Similar, though milder, hyperconnectivity of the TNN in unaffected siblings of schizophrenic patients may contribute to the identification of schizophrenia endophenotypes and ultimately to the determination of schizophrenia risk genes.
 
dc.description.naturepostprint
 
dc.identifier.citationSchizophrenia Bulletin, 2012, v. 38 n. 2, p. 285-294 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbq074
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbq074
 
dc.identifier.epage294
 
dc.identifier.hkuros188029
 
dc.identifier.hkuros177479
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300731100016
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China30670752
30900487
National Basic Research Program of China2006CB500808
2007CB512300
11th Five Year Key Program for Science and Technology Development of China2007BAI17B05
Funding Information:

National Natural Science Foundation of China (30670752 to Z.L. and 30900487 to Y.Z.); National Basic Research Program of China (2006CB500808, 2007CB512300); 11th Five Year Key Program for Science and Technology Development of China (2007BAI17B05).

 
dc.identifier.issn0586-7614
2012 Impact Factor: 8.486
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.691
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3283150
 
dc.identifier.pmid20595202
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863244364
 
dc.identifier.spage285
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129353
 
dc.identifier.volume38
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Bulletin
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Schizophrenia Bulletin following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Schizophrenia Bulletin, 2012, v. 38 n. 2, p. 285-294 is available online at: http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/content/38/2/285
 
dc.subjectSchizophrenia
 
dc.subjectUnaffected sibling
 
dc.subjectDefault mode network
 
dc.subjectFunctional connectivity
 
dc.subjectResting-state
 
dc.titleSchizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings share increased resting-state connectivity in the task-negative network but not its anticorrelated task-positive network
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Kaneko, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ouyang, X</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Li, L</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hao, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chen, EYH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Jiang, T</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhou, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Liu, Z</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Background: Abnormal connectivity of the anticorrelated intrinsic networks, the task-negative network (TNN), and the task-positive network (TPN) is implicated in schizophrenia. Comparisons between schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings enable further understanding of illness susceptibility and pathophysiology. We examined the resting-state connectivity differences in the intrinsic networks between schizophrenic patients, their unaffected siblings, and healthy controls. Methods: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance images were obtained from 25 individuals in each subject group. The posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were used as seed regions to identify the TNN and TPN through functional connectivity analysis. Interregional connectivity strengths were analyzed using overlapped intrinsic networks composed of regions common to all subject groups. Results: Schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings showed increased connectivity in the TNN between the bilateral inferior temporal gyri. By contrast, schizophrenic patients alone demonstrated increased connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and left inferior temporal gyrus and between the ventral medial prefrontal cortex and right lateral parietal cortex in the TNN. Schizophrenic patients exhibited increased connectivity between the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right inferior frontal gyrus in the TPN relative to their unaffected siblings, though this trend only approached statistical significance in comparison to healthy controls. Conclusion: Resting-state hyperconnectivity of the intrinsic networks may disrupt network coordination and thereby contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Similar, though milder, hyperconnectivity of the TNN in unaffected siblings of schizophrenic patients may contribute to the identification of schizophrenia endophenotypes and ultimately to the determination of schizophrenia risk genes.</description.abstract>
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<subject>Schizophrenia</subject>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Second Xiangya Hospital of Central-South University
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Institute of Automation Chinese Academy of Sciences
  4. Yale University
  5. Institute of Psychology Chinese Academy of Sciences
  6. Xiangya Hospital of Central-south University