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Article: Psychomotor control in a virtual laparoscopic surgery training environment: Gaze control parameters differentiate novices from experts

TitlePsychomotor control in a virtual laparoscopic surgery training environment: Gaze control parameters differentiate novices from experts
Authors
KeywordsEye-hand coordination
Gaze strategy
Laparoscopy training
Psychomotor control
Virtual reality
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/
Citation
Surgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2010, v. 24 n. 10, p. 2458-2464 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Surgical simulation is increasingly used to facilitate the adoption of technical skills during surgical training. This study sought to determine if gaze control parameters could differentiate between the visual control of experienced and novice operators performing an eye-hand coordination task on a virtual reality laparoscopic surgical simulator (LAP Mentor™). Typically adopted hand movement metrics reflect only one half of the eye-hand coordination relationship; therefore, little is known about how hand movements are guided and controlled by vision. Methods: A total of 14 right-handed surgeons were categorised as being either experienced (having led more than 70 laparoscopic procedures) or novice (having performed fewer than 10 procedures) operators. The eight experienced and six novice surgeons completed the eye-hand coordination task from the LAP Mentor basic skills package while wearing a gaze registration system. A variety of performance, movement, and gaze parameters were recorded and compared between groups. Results: The experienced surgeons completed the task significantly more quickly than the novices, but only the economy of movement of the left tool differentiated skill level from the LAP Mentor parameters. Gaze analyses revealed that experienced surgeons spent significantly more time fixating the target locations than novices, who split their time between focusing on the targets and tracking the tools. Conclusion: The findings of the study provide support for the utility of assessing strategic gaze behaviour to better understand the way in which surgeons utilise visual information to plan and control tool movements in a virtual reality laparoscopic environment. It is hoped that by better understanding the limitations of the psychomotor system, effective gaze training programs may be developed. © 2010 The Author(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/128965
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.54
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.695
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Economic and Social Research Council, UK
Research Grants Council, Hong KongRES-000-22-3016
Funding Information:

This work was supported by a bilateral research grant from the Economic and Social Research Council, UK, and the Research Grants Council, Hong Kong (RES-000-22-3016), awarded to the first and last authors.

References
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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVine, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBrewer, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDefriend, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-30T04:02:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-30T04:02:33Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSurgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2010, v. 24 n. 10, p. 2458-2464en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/128965-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Surgical simulation is increasingly used to facilitate the adoption of technical skills during surgical training. This study sought to determine if gaze control parameters could differentiate between the visual control of experienced and novice operators performing an eye-hand coordination task on a virtual reality laparoscopic surgical simulator (LAP Mentor™). Typically adopted hand movement metrics reflect only one half of the eye-hand coordination relationship; therefore, little is known about how hand movements are guided and controlled by vision. Methods: A total of 14 right-handed surgeons were categorised as being either experienced (having led more than 70 laparoscopic procedures) or novice (having performed fewer than 10 procedures) operators. The eight experienced and six novice surgeons completed the eye-hand coordination task from the LAP Mentor basic skills package while wearing a gaze registration system. A variety of performance, movement, and gaze parameters were recorded and compared between groups. Results: The experienced surgeons completed the task significantly more quickly than the novices, but only the economy of movement of the left tool differentiated skill level from the LAP Mentor parameters. Gaze analyses revealed that experienced surgeons spent significantly more time fixating the target locations than novices, who split their time between focusing on the targets and tracking the tools. Conclusion: The findings of the study provide support for the utility of assessing strategic gaze behaviour to better understand the way in which surgeons utilise visual information to plan and control tool movements in a virtual reality laparoscopic environment. It is hoped that by better understanding the limitations of the psychomotor system, effective gaze training programs may be developed. © 2010 The Author(s).en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniquesen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_HK
dc.rightsThe Author(s)en_US
dc.subjectEye-hand coordinationen_HK
dc.subjectGaze strategyen_HK
dc.subjectLaparoscopy trainingen_HK
dc.subjectPsychomotor controlen_HK
dc.subjectVirtual realityen_HK
dc.subject.meshClinical Competence-
dc.subject.meshComputer Simulation-
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopy - education-
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performance-
dc.subject.meshUser-Computer Interface-
dc.titlePsychomotor control in a virtual laparoscopic surgery training environment: Gaze control parameters differentiate novices from expertsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, R: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, R=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00464-010-0986-1en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20333405-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2945464-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957909931en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros183320-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957909931&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2458en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2464en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1432-2218en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282181500014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 01 Dec 2010-
dc.relation.projectGaze strategies of laparoscopy surgeons: Observational learning, implicit knowledge and performance in demanding conditions-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilson, M=7408663801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGrath, J=12774961300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVine, S=36811509000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrewer, J=36605834200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDefriend, D=6603918469en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, R=7102880488en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7016180-

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