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Conference Paper: Introduction to the aims, methods and main outcomes of the PLACE study

TitleIntroduction to the aims, methods and main outcomes of the PLACE study
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Sports medicine
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier Australia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/707423/description?navopenmenu=-2
Citation
The 6th National Physical Activity Conference (be active ‘07), Adelaide, Australia, 13-16 October 2007. In Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2007, v. 10 suppl. 1, p. 122, abstract no. 374 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction to the aims, methods and main outcomes of the PLACE study To set the scene for a symposium, the aims, methods and main outcomes of the PLACE (Physical Activity in Localities and Community Environments) study will be introduced. Although the primary aim of PLACE was to evaluate links between levels of physical activity and the environment, it also provides data for the examination of other behaviours related to physical activity, but not directly related to the environment. The PLACE study used a stratified sample design to categorise 32 communities in Adelaide, classified as high or low ‘walkable’ using objective measures of connectedness and proximity derived from Geographic Information Systems and matched for area-level socio-economic status (SES). Surveys were mailed to participants between July 2003 and June 2004. The primary physical activity variables examined were walking for transport and recreation. Analyses controlled for participant age, gender, SES, and reasons for neighbourhood self-selection. A strong independent association was found between weekly frequency of walking for transport and objectively derived neighbourhood walkability. Neighbourhood self-selection was a moderator of the relationship of walkability with weekly minutes, but not with frequency of walking for transport. There were no significant associations between environmental factors and walking for recreation. Associations of neighbourhood environment attributes with walking for transport were confirmed, supporting design for activity-friendly communities. The rich source of data in PLACE can also be used to better understand other health-related behaviours which may coexist or compete with physical activity. Subsequent presentations in this symposium will use this data to examine the correlates and consequences of sedentary behaviours.
DescriptionThe Conference will be held concurrently with the 2007 Recreation and Sport Development Conference, the Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, and the 5th National Sports Injury Prevention Conference.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/128754
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.756
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.484

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, E-
dc.contributor.authorOwen, N-
dc.contributor.authorCerin, E-
dc.contributor.authorBauman, A-
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-09T01:25:50Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-09T01:25:50Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationThe 6th National Physical Activity Conference (be active ‘07), Adelaide, Australia, 13-16 October 2007. In Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2007, v. 10 suppl. 1, p. 122, abstract no. 374-
dc.identifier.issn1440-2440-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/128754-
dc.descriptionThe Conference will be held concurrently with the 2007 Recreation and Sport Development Conference, the Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, and the 5th National Sports Injury Prevention Conference.-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction to the aims, methods and main outcomes of the PLACE study To set the scene for a symposium, the aims, methods and main outcomes of the PLACE (Physical Activity in Localities and Community Environments) study will be introduced. Although the primary aim of PLACE was to evaluate links between levels of physical activity and the environment, it also provides data for the examination of other behaviours related to physical activity, but not directly related to the environment. The PLACE study used a stratified sample design to categorise 32 communities in Adelaide, classified as high or low ‘walkable’ using objective measures of connectedness and proximity derived from Geographic Information Systems and matched for area-level socio-economic status (SES). Surveys were mailed to participants between July 2003 and June 2004. The primary physical activity variables examined were walking for transport and recreation. Analyses controlled for participant age, gender, SES, and reasons for neighbourhood self-selection. A strong independent association was found between weekly frequency of walking for transport and objectively derived neighbourhood walkability. Neighbourhood self-selection was a moderator of the relationship of walkability with weekly minutes, but not with frequency of walking for transport. There were no significant associations between environmental factors and walking for recreation. Associations of neighbourhood environment attributes with walking for transport were confirmed, supporting design for activity-friendly communities. The rich source of data in PLACE can also be used to better understand other health-related behaviours which may coexist or compete with physical activity. Subsequent presentations in this symposium will use this data to examine the correlates and consequences of sedentary behaviours.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Australia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/707423/description?navopenmenu=-2-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectSports medicine-
dc.titleIntroduction to the aims, methods and main outcomes of the PLACE studyen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.hkuros164981-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage122-
dc.identifier.epage122-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-
dc.description.otherThe 6th National Physical Activity Conference (be active ‘07), Adelaide, Australia, 13-16 October 2007. In Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2007, v. 10 suppl. 1, p. 122, abstract no. 374-

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