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Article: Factors related to suicidal ideation among adolescents in Hong Kong
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TitleFactors related to suicidal ideation among adolescents in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsNg, SM1
Ran, MS2
Chan, C1
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherBaywood Publishing Co., Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.baywood.com/journals/previewjournals.asp?id=1054-1373
 
CitationIllness Crisis And Loss, 2010, v. 18 n. 4, p. 341-354 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2190/IL.18.4.d
 
AbstractThe study investigated the relations among suicidal ideation, general mental health status (domains: depression, lack of confidence and uselessness; measured by the shorter General Health Questionnaire [GHQ]), and psychosocial difficulties and strengths with 2638 secondary school students in Hong Kong. A cross-sectional survey using self-report questionnaires was carried out. Suicidal ideation was assessed by four relevant items on GHQ. Overall prevalence of suicidal ideation was revealed to be 14.6%, with 1.9% at severe level. Binary logistic regression indicated that factors associated with increased level of suicidal ideation were being female, lack of confidence, conduct disorder, and emotional symptoms. Factors associated with lowered level of suicidal ideation were spirituality, tranquility, resilience, and being in senior grades. The prevalence of suicidal ideation revealed in this study is lower than findings of other local studies which included nonschool participants. This seems to confirm the overemphasis of academic achievements in Chinese culture. Similar to Western studies, being female appeared to be a risk factor in the current study, but showed a relatively lower odds ratio (1.67, versus over 2 in Western studies). Suicidal ideation among male Chinese adolescents appeared to be more prevalent than we used to believe. Apart from addressing risk factors and psychopathology, the findings of the current study point to the desirability of also addressing the spiritual and meaning domains in suicide prevention. © 2010, Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.
 
ISSN1054-1373
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.174
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.2190/IL.18.4.d
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorNg, SM
 
dc.contributor.authorRan, MS
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, C
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T14:31:51Z
 
dc.date.available2010-10-31T14:31:51Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractThe study investigated the relations among suicidal ideation, general mental health status (domains: depression, lack of confidence and uselessness; measured by the shorter General Health Questionnaire [GHQ]), and psychosocial difficulties and strengths with 2638 secondary school students in Hong Kong. A cross-sectional survey using self-report questionnaires was carried out. Suicidal ideation was assessed by four relevant items on GHQ. Overall prevalence of suicidal ideation was revealed to be 14.6%, with 1.9% at severe level. Binary logistic regression indicated that factors associated with increased level of suicidal ideation were being female, lack of confidence, conduct disorder, and emotional symptoms. Factors associated with lowered level of suicidal ideation were spirituality, tranquility, resilience, and being in senior grades. The prevalence of suicidal ideation revealed in this study is lower than findings of other local studies which included nonschool participants. This seems to confirm the overemphasis of academic achievements in Chinese culture. Similar to Western studies, being female appeared to be a risk factor in the current study, but showed a relatively lower odds ratio (1.67, versus over 2 in Western studies). Suicidal ideation among male Chinese adolescents appeared to be more prevalent than we used to believe. Apart from addressing risk factors and psychopathology, the findings of the current study point to the desirability of also addressing the spiritual and meaning domains in suicide prevention. © 2010, Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationIllness Crisis And Loss, 2010, v. 18 n. 4, p. 341-354 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2190/IL.18.4.d
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.2190/IL.18.4.d
 
dc.identifier.epage354
 
dc.identifier.hkuros173515
 
dc.identifier.hkuros183474
 
dc.identifier.issn1054-1373
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.174
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
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dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/128498
 
dc.identifier.volume18
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBaywood Publishing Co., Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.baywood.com/journals/previewjournals.asp?id=1054-1373
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofIllness Crisis and Loss
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleFactors related to suicidal ideation among adolescents in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Guam