File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Conference Paper: A visual manipulation used to examine the neural processing underpinning skilled interceptive movements

TitleA visual manipulation used to examine the neural processing underpinning skilled interceptive movements
Authors
KeywordsPsychology sports and games medical sciences
Sports medicine
Issue Date2010
PublisherHuman Kinetics.
Citation
The 2010 Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA 2010), Tucson, AZ., 10-12 June 2010. In Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2010, v. 32 suppl., p. S107 How to Cite?
AbstractCoupled interceptive actions are understood to be the result of neural processing - and visual information - which is distinct from that used for uncoupled perceptual responses. To date, the majority of studies examining skilled interception have relied on uncoupled perceptual responses; as a result it has been suggested that our current knowledge of the neural processes underpinning skilled interception is somewhat limited and biased (van der Kamp, Rivas, van Doorn, & Savelsbergh, 2008). Based on the distribution of the human visual pathways, it is understood that perceptual-cognitive responses produced by the ventral pathway rely on visual information of better quality than the relatively blurred information used for online interceptive responses produced by the dorsal pathway. As a result it was hypothesised that low levels of visual blur would adversely affect a coupled response, but not an uncoupled one. To examine the visual information used for action and perception, skilled cricket batters anticipated the direction of balls bowled towards them using a coupled hitting movement and an uncoupled verbal response in each of four different visual blur conditions (plano, 1.00, 2.00, 3.00). When anticipating outcomes with habitual (unblurred) vision, coupled responses were found to be more accurate than uncoupled ones (p < .01), highlighting the importance of the relationship between perception and action when seeking to examine perceptual-motor skills. ANOVA testing revealed a significant interaction between coupling and blur (F(3,18) = 3.70, p < .05). Low levels of visual blur did not affect coupled anticipation, a finding consistent with the relatively poorer visual information which online interceptive actions are proposed to rely on. In contrast, evidence was found to suggest that low levels of blur may enhance the uncoupled (verbal) perception of movement. This rather counterintuitive finding is considered in light of other psychological studies which have reported enhanced movement perception with the introduction of visual blur.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. contains NASPSPA 2010 Conference Program & Abstracts
Free Communications - Verbal and Poster: Motor Development, Motor Learning and Control, and Sport and Exercise Psychology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127897
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 2.185

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMann, DLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:53:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:53:03Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2010 Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA 2010), Tucson, AZ., 10-12 June 2010. In Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2010, v. 32 suppl., p. S107en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0895-2779-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127897-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. contains NASPSPA 2010 Conference Program & Abstracts-
dc.descriptionFree Communications - Verbal and Poster: Motor Development, Motor Learning and Control, and Sport and Exercise Psychology-
dc.description.abstractCoupled interceptive actions are understood to be the result of neural processing - and visual information - which is distinct from that used for uncoupled perceptual responses. To date, the majority of studies examining skilled interception have relied on uncoupled perceptual responses; as a result it has been suggested that our current knowledge of the neural processes underpinning skilled interception is somewhat limited and biased (van der Kamp, Rivas, van Doorn, & Savelsbergh, 2008). Based on the distribution of the human visual pathways, it is understood that perceptual-cognitive responses produced by the ventral pathway rely on visual information of better quality than the relatively blurred information used for online interceptive responses produced by the dorsal pathway. As a result it was hypothesised that low levels of visual blur would adversely affect a coupled response, but not an uncoupled one. To examine the visual information used for action and perception, skilled cricket batters anticipated the direction of balls bowled towards them using a coupled hitting movement and an uncoupled verbal response in each of four different visual blur conditions (plano, 1.00, 2.00, 3.00). When anticipating outcomes with habitual (unblurred) vision, coupled responses were found to be more accurate than uncoupled ones (p < .01), highlighting the importance of the relationship between perception and action when seeking to examine perceptual-motor skills. ANOVA testing revealed a significant interaction between coupling and blur (F(3,18) = 3.70, p < .05). Low levels of visual blur did not affect coupled anticipation, a finding consistent with the relatively poorer visual information which online interceptive actions are proposed to rely on. In contrast, evidence was found to suggest that low levels of blur may enhance the uncoupled (verbal) perception of movement. This rather counterintuitive finding is considered in light of other psychological studies which have reported enhanced movement perception with the introduction of visual blur.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics.-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychology-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectPsychology sports and games medical sciences-
dc.subjectSports medicine-
dc.titleA visual manipulation used to examine the neural processing underpinning skilled interceptive movementsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMann, DL: dmann@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailAbernethy, B: bruceab@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMann, DL=rp01492en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros182660en_HK
dc.identifier.volume32-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl.-
dc.identifier.spageS107-
dc.identifier.epageS107-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.description.otherThe 2010 Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA 2010), Tucson, AZ., 10-12 June 2010. In Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2010, v. 32 suppl., p. S107-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats