File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The Great Kanto Earthquake and the culture of catastrophe and reconstruction in 1920s Japan

TitleThe Great Kanto Earthquake and the culture of catastrophe and reconstruction in 1920s Japan
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherSociety for Japanese Studies. The Journal's web site is located at http://depts.washington.edu/jjs
Citation
Journal Of Japanese Studies, 2008, v. 34 n. 2, p. 295-331 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article explores the Great Kanto Earthquake as a window into Japan of the 1920s and examines how this disaster was interpreted and used for political, ideological, and social ends. I suggest that a wide cross-section of commentators described the disaster as an act of divine punishment to admonish Japan's subjects for leading what many claimed were self-centered, immoral, and extravagant lifestyles. I further argue that the disaster nurtured a strong sense that Japan possessed an unparalleled opportunity not only to rebuild Tokyo to reflect and reinforce new values but also to reconstruct the nation and its people. In doing so, the 1923 calamity fostered a culture of catastrophe and reconstruction that amplified discourses of moral degeneracy and national renovation in interwar Japan. © 2008 Society for Japanese Studies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127654
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.412
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.182
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchencking, JCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:38:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:38:13Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Japanese Studies, 2008, v. 34 n. 2, p. 295-331en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0095-6848en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127654-
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the Great Kanto Earthquake as a window into Japan of the 1920s and examines how this disaster was interpreted and used for political, ideological, and social ends. I suggest that a wide cross-section of commentators described the disaster as an act of divine punishment to admonish Japan's subjects for leading what many claimed were self-centered, immoral, and extravagant lifestyles. I further argue that the disaster nurtured a strong sense that Japan possessed an unparalleled opportunity not only to rebuild Tokyo to reflect and reinforce new values but also to reconstruct the nation and its people. In doing so, the 1923 calamity fostered a culture of catastrophe and reconstruction that amplified discourses of moral degeneracy and national renovation in interwar Japan. © 2008 Society for Japanese Studies.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for Japanese Studies. The Journal's web site is located at http://depts.washington.edu/jjsen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Japanese Studiesen_HK
dc.titleThe Great Kanto Earthquake and the culture of catastrophe and reconstruction in 1920s Japanen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0095-6848&volume=34:2&spage=295&epage=331&date=2008&atitle=The+Great+Kanto+Earthquake+and+the+Culture+of+Catastrophe+and+Reconstruction+in+1920s+Japanen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchencking, JC: jcharles@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchencking, JC=rp01196en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/jjs.0.0021-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-49949084471en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175999en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-49949084471&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume34en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage295en_HK
dc.identifier.epage331en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchencking, JC=14626781200en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats