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Article: The shark in the music

TitleThe shark in the music
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/MUSA
Citation
Music Analysis, 2010, v. 29 n. 1-3, p. 306-333 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article proposes a new understanding of dramatic scoring by revisiting the sequence of the notorious first shark attack in the horror film Jaws (1975). The success of the sequence, it is argued, turns on a bold and sophisticated use of preparatory material in the minutes preceding the attack. It is also suggested that, during the attack proper, it is the role of memory and the limits of attention that underpin the viewer-auditor's response to John Williams's famous motive. Drawing on the work of Richard Wollheim on the phenomenology of painting, it is proposed that the spectator 'hears-in' the music, and to buttress this central claim various articulations of the notion of 'hearing-in' are offered in the course of the discussion. The article ends with a rebuttal of the idea that music is heard unconsciously or subliminally. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127647
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.118
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBiancorosso, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:37:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:37:49Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMusic Analysis, 2010, v. 29 n. 1-3, p. 306-333en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0262-5245en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127647-
dc.description.abstractThis article proposes a new understanding of dramatic scoring by revisiting the sequence of the notorious first shark attack in the horror film Jaws (1975). The success of the sequence, it is argued, turns on a bold and sophisticated use of preparatory material in the minutes preceding the attack. It is also suggested that, during the attack proper, it is the role of memory and the limits of attention that underpin the viewer-auditor's response to John Williams's famous motive. Drawing on the work of Richard Wollheim on the phenomenology of painting, it is proposed that the spectator 'hears-in' the music, and to buttress this central claim various articulations of the notion of 'hearing-in' are offered in the course of the discussion. The article ends with a rebuttal of the idea that music is heard unconsciously or subliminally. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/MUSAen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMusic Analysisen_HK
dc.titleThe shark in the musicen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0262-5245&volume=30, i-iii&spage=&epage=&date=2011&atitle=The+Shark+in+the+Musicen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBiancorosso, G: rogopag@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBiancorosso, G=rp01213en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1468-2249.2011.00331.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84856420382en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174310en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84856420382&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage306en_HK
dc.identifier.epage333en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296909100014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBiancorosso, G=26121037800en_HK

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