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Article: Newly trained lexical categories produce lateralized categorical perception of color

TitleNewly trained lexical categories produce lateralized categorical perception of color
Authors
KeywordsCategory learning
Linguistic relativity
Nature versus nurture
Whorf hypothesis
Issue Date2010
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2010, v. 107 n. 22, p. 9974-9978 How to Cite?
AbstractLinguistic categories have been shown to influence perceptual discrimination, to do so preferentially in the right visual field, to fail to do so when competing demands are made on verbal memory, and to vary with the color-term boundaries of different languages. However, because there are strong commonalities across languages in the placement of color-term boundaries, the question remains open whether observed categorical perception for color can be entirely a result of learned categories or may rely to some degree on innate ones. We show here that lateralized color categorical perception can be entirely the result of learned categories. In a visual search task, reaction times to targets were faster in the right than the left visual field when the target and distractor colors, initially sharing the same linguistic term (e.g., "blue"), became between-category colors after training (i.e., when two different shades of blue had each acquired a new name). A control group, whose conditions exactly matched those of the experimental group except that no new categories were introduced, did not show this effect, establishing that the effect was not dependent on increased familiarity with either the color stimuli or the task. The present results show beyond question that lateralized categorical perception of color can reflect strictly learned color categories, even artificially learned categories that violate both universal tendencies in color naming and the categorization pattern of the language of the subject.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127645
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 9.423
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Ministry of Science and Technology of China2005CB522801
2005CB522802
US National Science Foundation0418404
Guangdong Natural Science Foundation on Task for Research Group06200524
National Natural Science Foundation of China30621004
90820307
Chinese Academy of SciencesKSCX2-YW-R-122
KSCX2-YW-R-259
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

We thank Sandra Fung and Anna Huang for assistance with stimulus preparation and computer programming, and Dong Daojing, Wei Zhou, and Ding Wen for help with testing subjects. This research was supported by a 973 grant from the National Strategic Basic Research Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2005CB522801, 2005CB522802), US National Science Foundation Grant 0418404, Guangdong Natural Science Foundation on Task for Research Group 06200524, National Natural Science Foundation of China Grants 30621004 and 90820307, Chinese Academy of Sciences Grants KSCX2-YW-R-122 and KSCX2-YW-R-259, and the University of Hong Kong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorMo, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorKay, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwok, VPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIp, TNMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:37:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:37:42Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2010, v. 107 n. 22, p. 9974-9978en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127645-
dc.description.abstractLinguistic categories have been shown to influence perceptual discrimination, to do so preferentially in the right visual field, to fail to do so when competing demands are made on verbal memory, and to vary with the color-term boundaries of different languages. However, because there are strong commonalities across languages in the placement of color-term boundaries, the question remains open whether observed categorical perception for color can be entirely a result of learned categories or may rely to some degree on innate ones. We show here that lateralized color categorical perception can be entirely the result of learned categories. In a visual search task, reaction times to targets were faster in the right than the left visual field when the target and distractor colors, initially sharing the same linguistic term (e.g., "blue"), became between-category colors after training (i.e., when two different shades of blue had each acquired a new name). A control group, whose conditions exactly matched those of the experimental group except that no new categories were introduced, did not show this effect, establishing that the effect was not dependent on increased familiarity with either the color stimuli or the task. The present results show beyond question that lateralized categorical perception of color can reflect strictly learned color categories, even artificially learned categories that violate both universal tendencies in color naming and the categorization pattern of the language of the subject.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen_HK
dc.subjectCategory learningen_HK
dc.subjectLinguistic relativityen_HK
dc.subjectNature versus nurtureen_HK
dc.subjectWhorf hypothesisen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshColor Perception-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshLanguage-
dc.subject.meshLearning-
dc.titleNewly trained lexical categories produce lateralized categorical perception of coloren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0027-8424&volume=107&issue=22&spage=9974&epage=9978&date=2010&atitle=Newly+trained+lexical+categories+produce+lateralized+categorical+perception+of+color-
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1005669107en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20479228-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2890491-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953456353en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros180148en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953456353&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume107en_HK
dc.identifier.issue22en_HK
dc.identifier.spage9974en_HK
dc.identifier.epage9978en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278246000015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, K=36246938500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMo, L=35237797900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKay, P=7102087705en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, VPY=36971764900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, TNM=36337071700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_HK

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