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Article: Endolithic microbial colonization of limestone in a high-altitude arid environment

TitleEndolithic microbial colonization of limestone in a high-altitude arid environment
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00248/index.htm
Citation
Microbial Ecology, 2010, v. 59 n. 4, p. 689-699 How to Cite?
AbstractThe morphology of endolithic colonization in a limestone escarpment and surrounding rocky debris (termed float) at a high-altitude arid site in central Tibet was documented using scanning electron microscopy. Putative lichenized structures and extensive coccoid bacterial colonization were observed. Absolute and relative abundance of rRNA gene signatures using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis of environmental phylotypes were used to characterize community structure across all domains. Escarpment endoliths were dominated by eukaryotic phylotypes suggestive of lichenised associations (a Trebouxia lichen phycobiont and Leptodontidium lichen mycobiont), whereas float endoliths were dominated by bacterial phylotypes, including the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis plus several unidentified beta proteobacteria and crenarchaea. Among a range of abiotic variables tested, ultraviolet (UV) transmittance by rock substrates was the factor best able to explain differences in community structure, with eukaryotic lichen phylotypes more abundant under conditions of greater UV-exposure compared to prokaryotes. Variously pigmented float rocks did not support significantly different communities. Estimates of in situ carbon fixation based upon 14C radio-labelled bicarbonate uptake indicated endolithic productivity of approximately 2.01 g C/m2/year-1, intermediate between estimates for Antarctic and temperate communities. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127445
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.232
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.346
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grants CouncilHKU 7375/05M
HKU 7733/08M
Stephen Hui Trust Fund
Funding Information:

The authors are grateful to the Tibet Ministry of Geology for fieldwork assistance and to the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (grant numbers HKU 7375/05M and HKU 7733/08M) and Stephen Hui Trust Fund for financial support.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, FKYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, MCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLacap, DCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAitchison, JCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowan, DAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:25:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:25:59Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMicrobial Ecology, 2010, v. 59 n. 4, p. 689-699en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0095-3628en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127445-
dc.description.abstractThe morphology of endolithic colonization in a limestone escarpment and surrounding rocky debris (termed float) at a high-altitude arid site in central Tibet was documented using scanning electron microscopy. Putative lichenized structures and extensive coccoid bacterial colonization were observed. Absolute and relative abundance of rRNA gene signatures using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis of environmental phylotypes were used to characterize community structure across all domains. Escarpment endoliths were dominated by eukaryotic phylotypes suggestive of lichenised associations (a Trebouxia lichen phycobiont and Leptodontidium lichen mycobiont), whereas float endoliths were dominated by bacterial phylotypes, including the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis plus several unidentified beta proteobacteria and crenarchaea. Among a range of abiotic variables tested, ultraviolet (UV) transmittance by rock substrates was the factor best able to explain differences in community structure, with eukaryotic lichen phylotypes more abundant under conditions of greater UV-exposure compared to prokaryotes. Variously pigmented float rocks did not support significantly different communities. Estimates of in situ carbon fixation based upon 14C radio-labelled bicarbonate uptake indicated endolithic productivity of approximately 2.01 g C/m2/year-1, intermediate between estimates for Antarctic and temperate communities. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00248/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMicrobial Ecologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subject.meshAltitude-
dc.subject.meshBacteria - classification - genetics - growth and development - isolation and purification-
dc.subject.meshCalcium Carbonate - analysis-
dc.subject.meshDesert Climate-
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Microbiology-
dc.titleEndolithic microbial colonization of limestone in a high-altitude arid environmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0095-3628&volume=59&issue=4&spage=689&epage=699&date=2009&atitle=Endolithic+microbial+colonization+of+limestone+in+a+high-altitude+arid+environment-
dc.identifier.emailLau, MCY: maglau@princeton.eduen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAitchison, JC: jona@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPointing, SB: pointing@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, MCY=rp00721en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAitchison, JC=rp00658en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPointing, SB=rp00771en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00248-009-9607-8en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19937324-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953326643en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros174777en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953326643&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume59en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage689en_HK
dc.identifier.epage699en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278349400007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, FKY=35178703800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, MCY=35177794300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLacap, DC=9640383000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAitchison, JC=7102533858en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowan, DA=24425600900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPointing, SB=6603986412en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6286350-

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