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Article: Male body size predicts sperm number in the mandarinfish

TitleMale body size predicts sperm number in the mandarinfish
Authors
KeywordsFecundity benefit
Female choice
Mandarinfish
Sperm number
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd.
Citation
Journal Of Zoology, 2010, v. 281 n. 3, p. 161-167 How to Cite?
AbstractTheory predicts that, in species with non-resource-based mating systems, female preference for male sexual traits might be selected to ensure higher levels of fertility. Accordingly, secondary sexual traits used by females to assess males are expected to covary with ejaculate size and/or quality transferred during copulation, and female fecundity should be directly linked to mating with more attractive males. To date, direct tests of this hypothesis have been performed on internal fertilizing species, where several factors, such as for instance sperm competition, cryptic female choice, male parasite load, may affect ejaculate characteristics and female fecundity. Here, we used as a model the mandarinfish Synchiropus splendidus a small pelagic spawner where males only provide females with ejaculates and sperm competition does not occur. Males are significantly larger than females and we experimentally demonstrated that females prefer larger males. In addition, by collecting gametes from 67 natural spawning events, we attained a measure of the number of eggs and sperm released in each spawning event and the fertilization rates. The mean number of gametes produced positively correlates with body size in both sexes. Males do not regulate sperm number according to egg number and/or female body size. Fertilization success is significantly related to the mean number of sperm released but not directly to male body size. These findings, despite not fully accomplishing theoretical expectation, suggest that larger and more fecund females may suffer sperm limitation in mating with smaller males. In addition, our results have possible implications for the aquarium fishery of this species, which targets large males. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Zoological Society of London.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127442
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.819
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.032
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Coral Reef Research Foundation in Palau
National Geographic Society6295-98
Funding Information:

We thank the staff of the Coral Reef Research Foundation in Palau for their kind support and C. Mazzoldi for invaluable help with statistical analysis. Research was funded by the National Geographic Society grant number 6295-98.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRasotto, MBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDe Mitcheson, YSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMitcheson, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:25:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:25:49Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Zoology, 2010, v. 281 n. 3, p. 161-167en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0952-8369en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127442-
dc.description.abstractTheory predicts that, in species with non-resource-based mating systems, female preference for male sexual traits might be selected to ensure higher levels of fertility. Accordingly, secondary sexual traits used by females to assess males are expected to covary with ejaculate size and/or quality transferred during copulation, and female fecundity should be directly linked to mating with more attractive males. To date, direct tests of this hypothesis have been performed on internal fertilizing species, where several factors, such as for instance sperm competition, cryptic female choice, male parasite load, may affect ejaculate characteristics and female fecundity. Here, we used as a model the mandarinfish Synchiropus splendidus a small pelagic spawner where males only provide females with ejaculates and sperm competition does not occur. Males are significantly larger than females and we experimentally demonstrated that females prefer larger males. In addition, by collecting gametes from 67 natural spawning events, we attained a measure of the number of eggs and sperm released in each spawning event and the fertilization rates. The mean number of gametes produced positively correlates with body size in both sexes. Males do not regulate sperm number according to egg number and/or female body size. Fertilization success is significantly related to the mean number of sperm released but not directly to male body size. These findings, despite not fully accomplishing theoretical expectation, suggest that larger and more fecund females may suffer sperm limitation in mating with smaller males. In addition, our results have possible implications for the aquarium fishery of this species, which targets large males. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Zoological Society of London.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd.-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Zoologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectFecundity benefiten_HK
dc.subjectFemale choiceen_HK
dc.subjectMandarinfishen_HK
dc.subjectSperm numberen_HK
dc.titleMale body size predicts sperm number in the mandarinfishen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0952-8369&volume=281&issue=3&spage=161&epage=167&date=2010&atitle=Male+body+size+predicts+sperm+number+in+the+mandarinfishen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDe Mitcheson, YS: yjsadovy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMitcheson, G: georgem@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDe Mitcheson, YS=rp00773en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMitcheson, G=rp01729en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1469-7998.2009.00688.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954858056en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros178681en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954858056&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume281en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage161en_HK
dc.identifier.epage167en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278927200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRasotto, MB=6701539567en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Mitcheson, YS=6603830002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMitcheson, G=17341029600en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7402475-

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