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Article: Male morphotypes and mating behavior of the dancing shrimp Rhynchocinetes brucei (Decapoda: Caridea)

TitleMale morphotypes and mating behavior of the dancing shrimp Rhynchocinetes brucei (Decapoda: Caridea)
Authors
Keywordsdimorphism
mate guarding
mating behavior
morphotypes
Rhynchocinetes brucei
sexual selection
Issue Date2010
PublisherCrustacean Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.vims.edu/tcs/
Citation
Journal Of Crustacean Biology, 2010, v. 30 n. 4, p. 580-588 How to Cite?
AbstractIn crustaceans, the presence of large males with highly developed prehensile appendages (chelipeds or gnathopods) generally is suggestive of female monopolization during her receptive period. While mate guarding is common among some malacostracan crustaceans (brachyuran crabs and some amphipod families) it is relatively rare in caridean shrimp. Here we explored sexual dimorphism and the presence of morphotypic differences among males of the dancing shrimp Rhynchocinetes brucei. We furthermore quantified the behavioral events during mating interactions to examine whether mate guarding extends over the entire period of female receptivity. Males and females had similar body sizes, but males developed increasingly larger third maxillipeds and first chelipeds during ontogeny. Large males with hyperdeveloped maxillipeds and very large chelipeds featured a high degree of broken appendages and eyes, which probably results from intrasexual agonistic interactions. About 30% of the non-competitive male-female interactions with post-ovigerous females resulted in successful matings. Males usually initiated body contact with the female shortly after the female's parturial molt, and they frequently touched the female's genital region with their anterior body parts. The first (and in most cases only) spermatophore transfer event occurred at variable times (0.2-7 h) after the female's molt. Following spermatophore transfer some males guarded the female in the cage state (between their pereiopods) until the female had finished spawning and was ovigerous. Post-copulatory mate guarding could last up to 70 min, but not all males guarded the female after the copulation. We suggest that male guarding of the receptive female throughout the mating process reduces the risk of sperm competition. © 2010 The Crustacean Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127436
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.922
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.511
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong University
School of Biological Science of Hong Kong University
SWIMS
Funding Information:

This study was funded by Hong Kong University Seed program to CPD. MT received support from the School of Biological Science of Hong Kong University and SWIMS during his sabbatical stay in Hong Kong. During the writing phase of this manuscript MT was generously hosted by A. Hines at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, MD.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThiel, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorChak, STCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDumont, CPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:25:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:25:29Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Crustacean Biology, 2010, v. 30 n. 4, p. 580-588en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0278-0372en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127436-
dc.description.abstractIn crustaceans, the presence of large males with highly developed prehensile appendages (chelipeds or gnathopods) generally is suggestive of female monopolization during her receptive period. While mate guarding is common among some malacostracan crustaceans (brachyuran crabs and some amphipod families) it is relatively rare in caridean shrimp. Here we explored sexual dimorphism and the presence of morphotypic differences among males of the dancing shrimp Rhynchocinetes brucei. We furthermore quantified the behavioral events during mating interactions to examine whether mate guarding extends over the entire period of female receptivity. Males and females had similar body sizes, but males developed increasingly larger third maxillipeds and first chelipeds during ontogeny. Large males with hyperdeveloped maxillipeds and very large chelipeds featured a high degree of broken appendages and eyes, which probably results from intrasexual agonistic interactions. About 30% of the non-competitive male-female interactions with post-ovigerous females resulted in successful matings. Males usually initiated body contact with the female shortly after the female's parturial molt, and they frequently touched the female's genital region with their anterior body parts. The first (and in most cases only) spermatophore transfer event occurred at variable times (0.2-7 h) after the female's molt. Following spermatophore transfer some males guarded the female in the cage state (between their pereiopods) until the female had finished spawning and was ovigerous. Post-copulatory mate guarding could last up to 70 min, but not all males guarded the female after the copulation. We suggest that male guarding of the receptive female throughout the mating process reduces the risk of sperm competition. © 2010 The Crustacean Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCrustacean Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.vims.edu/tcs/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Crustacean Biologyen_HK
dc.subjectdimorphismen_HK
dc.subjectmate guardingen_HK
dc.subjectmating behavioren_HK
dc.subjectmorphotypesen_HK
dc.subjectRhynchocinetes bruceien_HK
dc.subjectsexual selectionen_HK
dc.titleMale morphotypes and mating behavior of the dancing shrimp Rhynchocinetes brucei (Decapoda: Caridea)en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0278-0372&volume=33&spage=580&epage=588&date=2010&atitle=Mating+behavior+of+the+dancing+shrimp+Rhynchocinetes+brucei+(Decapoda:+Caridea)en_HK
dc.identifier.emailDumont, CP: dumont.clement@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDumont, CP=rp00692en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1651/09-3272.1en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78449267914en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros175303en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78449267914&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume30en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage580en_HK
dc.identifier.epage588en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284514100005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThiel, M=35231340100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChak, STC=35767561600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDumont, CP=13407874500en_HK

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