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Article: Rolling stones and stable homes: Social structure, habitat diversity and population genetics of the Hawaiian spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris)

TitleRolling stones and stable homes: Social structure, habitat diversity and population genetics of the Hawaiian spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris)
Authors
KeywordsDispersal
Habitat availability
Insularity
Microsatellites
MtDNA
Population structure
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/MEC
Citation
Molecular Ecology, 2010, v. 19 n. 4, p. 732-748 How to Cite?
AbstractSpinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) exhibit different social behaviours at two regions in the Hawaiian Archipelago: off the high volcanic islands in the SE archipelago they form dynamic groups with ever-changing membership, but in the low carbonate atolls in the NW archipelago they form long-term stable groups. To determine whether these environmental and social differences influence population genetic structure, we surveyed spinner dolphins throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago with mtDNA control region sequences and 10 microsatellite loci (n = 505). F-statistics, Bayesian cluster analyses, and assignment tests revealed population genetic separations between most islands, with less genetic structuring among the NW atolls than among the SE high islands. The populations with the most stable social structure (Midway and Kure Atolls) have the highest gene flow between populations (mtDNA ST < 0.001, P = 0.357; microsatellite F ST = -0.001; P = 0.597), and a population with dynamic groups and fluid social structure (the Kona Coast of the island of Hawai'i) has the lowest gene flow (mtDNA 0.042 < ST < 0.236, P < 0.05; microsatellite 0.016 < F ST < 0.040, P < 0.001). We suggest that gene flow, dispersal, and social structure are influenced by the availability of habitat and resources at each island. Genetic comparisons to a South Pacific location (n = 16) indicate that Hawaiian populations are genetically depauperate and isolated from other Pacific locations (mtDNA 0.216 < F ST < 0.643, P < 0.001; microsatellite 0.058 < F ST < 0.090, P < 0.001); this isolation may also influence social and genetic structure within Hawai'i. Our results illustrate that genetic and social structure are flexible traits that can vary between even closely-related populations. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127416
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.947
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.925
ISI Accession Number ID
References
Errata

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, KRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarczmarski, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorAu, WWLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRickards, SHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVanderlip, CAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBowen, BWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGordon Grau, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorToonen, RJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:24:22Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:24:22Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMolecular Ecology, 2010, v. 19 n. 4, p. 732-748en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0962-1083en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127416-
dc.description.abstractSpinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) exhibit different social behaviours at two regions in the Hawaiian Archipelago: off the high volcanic islands in the SE archipelago they form dynamic groups with ever-changing membership, but in the low carbonate atolls in the NW archipelago they form long-term stable groups. To determine whether these environmental and social differences influence population genetic structure, we surveyed spinner dolphins throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago with mtDNA control region sequences and 10 microsatellite loci (n = 505). F-statistics, Bayesian cluster analyses, and assignment tests revealed population genetic separations between most islands, with less genetic structuring among the NW atolls than among the SE high islands. The populations with the most stable social structure (Midway and Kure Atolls) have the highest gene flow between populations (mtDNA ST < 0.001, P = 0.357; microsatellite F ST = -0.001; P = 0.597), and a population with dynamic groups and fluid social structure (the Kona Coast of the island of Hawai'i) has the lowest gene flow (mtDNA 0.042 < ST < 0.236, P < 0.05; microsatellite 0.016 < F ST < 0.040, P < 0.001). We suggest that gene flow, dispersal, and social structure are influenced by the availability of habitat and resources at each island. Genetic comparisons to a South Pacific location (n = 16) indicate that Hawaiian populations are genetically depauperate and isolated from other Pacific locations (mtDNA 0.216 < F ST < 0.643, P < 0.001; microsatellite 0.058 < F ST < 0.090, P < 0.001); this isolation may also influence social and genetic structure within Hawai'i. Our results illustrate that genetic and social structure are flexible traits that can vary between even closely-related populations. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/MECen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular Ecologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.comen_HK
dc.subjectDispersalen_HK
dc.subjectHabitat availabilityen_HK
dc.subjectInsularityen_HK
dc.subjectMicrosatellitesen_HK
dc.subjectMtDNAen_HK
dc.subjectPopulation structureen_HK
dc.titleRolling stones and stable homes: Social structure, habitat diversity and population genetics of the Hawaiian spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris)en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0962-1083&volume=19&spage=732&epage=748&date=2010&atitle=Rolling+stones+and+stable+homes:+Social+structure,+habitat+diversity,+and+population+genetics+of+the+Hawaiian+spinner+dolphin+(Stenella+longirostris).en_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarczmarski, L: leszek@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarczmarski, L=rp00713en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04521.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20089122-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77749301196en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros180856en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77749301196&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage732en_HK
dc.identifier.epage748en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-294X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000273953400010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.erratumdoi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04592.x-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAndrews, KR=14833738000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarczmarski, L=6603422145en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu, WWL=7202383079en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRickards, SH=14834600500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanderlip, CA=8918247400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBowen, BW=7103036452en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGordon Grau, E=15730938100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridToonen, RJ=6701532313en_HK

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