File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Non-climatic thermal adaptation: Implications for species' responses to climate warming

TitleNon-climatic thermal adaptation: Implications for species' responses to climate warming
Authors
KeywordsClimate change
Global warming
Thermal adaptation
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org
Citation
Biology Letters, 2010, v. 6 n. 5, p. 669-673 How to Cite?
Abstract
There is considerable interest in understanding how ectothermic animals may physiologically and behaviourally buffer the effects of climate warming. Much less consideration is being given to how organisms might adapt to non- climatic heat sources in ways that could confound predictions for responses of species and communities to climate warming. Although adaptation to non-climatic heat sources (solar and geothermal) seems likely in some marine species, climate warming predictions for marine ectotherms are largely based on adaptation to climatically relevant heat sources (air or surface sea water temperature). Here, we show that non-climatic solar heating underlies thermal resistance adaptation in a rocky-eulittoralfringe snail. Comparisons of the maximum temperatures of the air, the snail's body and the rock substratum with solar irradiance and physiological performance show that the highest body temperature is primarily controlled by solar heating and re-radiation, and that the snail's upper lethal temperature exceeds the highest climatically relevant regional air temperature by approximately 22°C. Non-climatic thermal adaptation probably features widely among marine and terrestrial ectotherms and because it could enable species to tolerate climatic rises in air temperature, it deserves more consideration in general and for inclusion into climate warming models. © 2010 The Royal Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127345
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 3.425
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, DJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcQuaid, CDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:20:07Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:20:07Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiology Letters, 2010, v. 6 n. 5, p. 669-673en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1744-9561en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127345-
dc.description.abstractThere is considerable interest in understanding how ectothermic animals may physiologically and behaviourally buffer the effects of climate warming. Much less consideration is being given to how organisms might adapt to non- climatic heat sources in ways that could confound predictions for responses of species and communities to climate warming. Although adaptation to non-climatic heat sources (solar and geothermal) seems likely in some marine species, climate warming predictions for marine ectotherms are largely based on adaptation to climatically relevant heat sources (air or surface sea water temperature). Here, we show that non-climatic solar heating underlies thermal resistance adaptation in a rocky-eulittoralfringe snail. Comparisons of the maximum temperatures of the air, the snail's body and the rock substratum with solar irradiance and physiological performance show that the highest body temperature is primarily controlled by solar heating and re-radiation, and that the snail's upper lethal temperature exceeds the highest climatically relevant regional air temperature by approximately 22°C. Non-climatic thermal adaptation probably features widely among marine and terrestrial ectotherms and because it could enable species to tolerate climatic rises in air temperature, it deserves more consideration in general and for inclusion into climate warming models. © 2010 The Royal Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiology Lettersen_HK
dc.subjectClimate changeen_HK
dc.subjectGlobal warmingen_HK
dc.subjectThermal adaptationen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Physiological-
dc.subject.meshBody Temperature-
dc.subject.meshClimate Change-
dc.subject.meshSnails - physiology-
dc.subject.meshSunlight-
dc.titleNon-climatic thermal adaptation: Implications for species' responses to climate warmingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1744-9561&volume=6&issue=5&spage=669&epage=673&date=2010&atitle=Non-climatic+thermal+adaptation:+implications+for+species%27+responses+to+climate+warmingen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsbl.2010.0233en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20375046en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2936162-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77958485921en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros181090en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77958485921&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage669en_HK
dc.identifier.epage673en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1744-957X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281739100027-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarshall, DJ=7402186519en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcQuaid, CD=7005808952en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, GA=7406082821en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7862241-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats