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Conference Paper: Visual and task characteristics may explain hemispheric asymmetry in visual word recognition

TitleVisual and task characteristics may explain hemispheric asymmetry in visual word recognition
Authors
KeywordsVisual word recognition
Hemispheric asymmetry
Computational modeling
Issue Date2010
PublisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
Citation
The 32nd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2010), Portland, OR., 11-14 August, 2010. In Proceedings of the 32nd CogSci, 2010, p. 1441-1446 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious studies proposed that the left hemisphere (LH) lateralization in English word recognition is because of the LH superiority in language processing. Nevertheless, Chinese character recognition has been shown to be more bilateral or right hemisphere (RH) lateralized and thus is a counter example of this claim. Through computational modeling, here we show that at least two factors other than language lateralization may influence hemispheric asymmetry in visual word recognition: (1) Visual similarity among words, which can be influenced by the ratio between the alphabet size and the lexicon size and the visual similarity among letters: We show that the more similar the words are in the lexicon, the more high spatial frequency (HSF) information is required to distinguish them, and this leads to more LH lateralization (2) The requirement to decompose a word into letters in order to map them to corresponding phonemes in pronunciation: We show that letter identity mapping requires more HSF information than word identity mapping, and alphabetic reading requires more HSF information than logographic reading; this leads to more LH lateralization in alphabetic languages. These two visual and task characteristic factors alone may explain differences in lateralization between English word and Chinese character recognition, without assuming the influence from language lateralization.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127186
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KCFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, JHWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:11:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:11:04Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 32nd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2010), Portland, OR., 11-14 August, 2010. In Proceedings of the 32nd CogSci, 2010, p. 1441-1446en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1069-7977-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127186-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies proposed that the left hemisphere (LH) lateralization in English word recognition is because of the LH superiority in language processing. Nevertheless, Chinese character recognition has been shown to be more bilateral or right hemisphere (RH) lateralized and thus is a counter example of this claim. Through computational modeling, here we show that at least two factors other than language lateralization may influence hemispheric asymmetry in visual word recognition: (1) Visual similarity among words, which can be influenced by the ratio between the alphabet size and the lexicon size and the visual similarity among letters: We show that the more similar the words are in the lexicon, the more high spatial frequency (HSF) information is required to distinguish them, and this leads to more LH lateralization (2) The requirement to decompose a word into letters in order to map them to corresponding phonemes in pronunciation: We show that letter identity mapping requires more HSF information than word identity mapping, and alphabetic reading requires more HSF information than logographic reading; this leads to more LH lateralization in alphabetic languages. These two visual and task characteristic factors alone may explain differences in lateralization between English word and Chinese character recognition, without assuming the influence from language lateralization.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2010-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThis is an electronic version of an article published in Cognitive Science Society Annual Conference Proceedings, 2010, p. 1441-1446. Cognitive Science Society Annual Conference Proceedings is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article-
dc.subjectVisual word recognition-
dc.subjectHemispheric asymmetry-
dc.subjectComputational modeling-
dc.titleVisual and task characteristics may explain hemispheric asymmetry in visual word recognitionen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KCF: kloser@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHsiao, JHW: jhsiao@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHsiao, JHW=rp00632en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros175505en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1441-
dc.identifier.epage1446-
dc.description.otherThe 32nd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2010), Portland, OR., 11-14 August, 2010. In Proceedings of the 32nd CogSci, 2010, p. 1441-1446-

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