File Download
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Overhearing a second language and cognitive development

TitleOverhearing a second language and cognitive development
Authors
Issue Date2009
Citation
The 2009 international conference on Access to Language and Cognitive Development in Young Children, Trieste, Italy, 30-31 October 2009. How to Cite?
AbstractDespite its significance for understanding language acquisition, the role of early language experience has been examined almost exclusively in linguistic deprivation studies focusing on what cannot be readily learned beyond childhood. Our research focused instead on long-term effects of what can be learned best during childhood. We focused on adult learners of Spanish/Korean who had spoken Spanish/Korean as their native language before age 6 and only minimally, if at all, thereafter until they began to re-learn the language after age 13 years. They were compared with native speakers, childhood (over)hearers, and typical late-second-language (L2)-learners of Spanish/Korean. Although far from native-like, childhood speakers of Spanish reliably outperformed childhood overhearers and typical late-L2-learners on measures of grammar. Both childhood speakers and overhearers spoke Spanish with a more native-like accent than typical late-L2-learners. To date, we have documented benefits of childhood experience with Korean only in the domain of phonology. In a new line of investigation, we explore access to very early linguistic experience by focusing on adults adopted under age 12 months from Korea by families in the U.S. Preliminary findings suggest early learning about ambient language can be accessed in adulthood upon re-learning.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127169

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, TKFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:10:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:10:08Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2009 international conference on Access to Language and Cognitive Development in Young Children, Trieste, Italy, 30-31 October 2009.en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127169-
dc.description.abstractDespite its significance for understanding language acquisition, the role of early language experience has been examined almost exclusively in linguistic deprivation studies focusing on what cannot be readily learned beyond childhood. Our research focused instead on long-term effects of what can be learned best during childhood. We focused on adult learners of Spanish/Korean who had spoken Spanish/Korean as their native language before age 6 and only minimally, if at all, thereafter until they began to re-learn the language after age 13 years. They were compared with native speakers, childhood (over)hearers, and typical late-second-language (L2)-learners of Spanish/Korean. Although far from native-like, childhood speakers of Spanish reliably outperformed childhood overhearers and typical late-L2-learners on measures of grammar. Both childhood speakers and overhearers spoke Spanish with a more native-like accent than typical late-L2-learners. To date, we have documented benefits of childhood experience with Korean only in the domain of phonology. In a new line of investigation, we explore access to very early linguistic experience by focusing on adults adopted under age 12 months from Korea by families in the U.S. Preliminary findings suggest early learning about ambient language can be accessed in adulthood upon re-learning.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Conference on Access to Language and Cognitive Development-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleOverhearing a second language and cognitive developmenten_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAu, TKF: terryau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAu, TKF=rp00580en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros176016en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats