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Conference Paper: Role of surgery in head and neck palliation

TitleRole of surgery in head and neck palliation
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Otorhinolaryngology
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COA
Citation
The 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, Liverpool, UK., 8-10 July 2009, In Clinical Otolaryngology, v. 34 s1, p. 43 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of management of head and neck cancer is the eradication of tumour while at the same time restoring form and function for the patient. This is not always possible, especially when the patient presents with advanced stage disease. Surgery however still contributes to the palliation of symptoms under some situations. Palliative surgical resection of the primary pathology with close margins might be carried out to relief the symptoms of dysphagia and airway obstruction. With the appropriate reconstruction and other adjuvant therapy, the duration of symptom-free period achieved could be significant. Tracheostomy could be performed to bypass airway obstruction or to decrease aspiration. Vascular reconstruction could be carried out to create access for intraarterial chemotherapy for non-resectable tumour. Significant palliation might be achieved for some tumours. When a non-resectable and fungating tumour starts bleeding, the tumour mass could be removed and the raw area covered with a flap to reduce discharge and further bleeding. Sometimes debulking surgery is done to reduce the deformity and restore dignity for these unfortunate patients. In contrast with other malignancies, patients with advanced head and neck cancer frequently have a clear understanding of their disease. Their suffering physically and psychologically are sometimes much more than other patients with advanced cancer. Surgery should be carried out whenever appropriate to reduce their symptoms.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. is the Sepcial issue: Abstracts of the 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, 2009
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127009
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.627
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.816

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWei, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:01:07Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:01:07Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, Liverpool, UK., 8-10 July 2009, In Clinical Otolaryngology, v. 34 s1, p. 43en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1749-4478-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127009-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. is the Sepcial issue: Abstracts of the 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, 2009-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of management of head and neck cancer is the eradication of tumour while at the same time restoring form and function for the patient. This is not always possible, especially when the patient presents with advanced stage disease. Surgery however still contributes to the palliation of symptoms under some situations. Palliative surgical resection of the primary pathology with close margins might be carried out to relief the symptoms of dysphagia and airway obstruction. With the appropriate reconstruction and other adjuvant therapy, the duration of symptom-free period achieved could be significant. Tracheostomy could be performed to bypass airway obstruction or to decrease aspiration. Vascular reconstruction could be carried out to create access for intraarterial chemotherapy for non-resectable tumour. Significant palliation might be achieved for some tumours. When a non-resectable and fungating tumour starts bleeding, the tumour mass could be removed and the raw area covered with a flap to reduce discharge and further bleeding. Sometimes debulking surgery is done to reduce the deformity and restore dignity for these unfortunate patients. In contrast with other malignancies, patients with advanced head and neck cancer frequently have a clear understanding of their disease. Their suffering physically and psychologically are sometimes much more than other patients with advanced cancer. Surgery should be carried out whenever appropriate to reduce their symptoms.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COA-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Otolaryngology-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOtorhinolaryngology-
dc.titleRole of surgery in head and neck palliationen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWei, W: hrmswwi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWei, W=rp00323en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1749-4486.2009.01964_3.x-
dc.identifier.hkuros166313en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros182419-
dc.identifier.volume34-
dc.identifier.issues1-
dc.identifier.spage43-
dc.identifier.epage43-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130711-

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