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Conference Paper: How my philosophy has changed over the past two decades

TitleHow my philosophy has changed over the past two decades
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Otorhinolaryngology
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COA
Citation
The 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, Liverpool, UK., 8-10 July 2009, In Clinical Otolaryngology, v. 34 s1, p. 38-39 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the sixties and the seventies, the optimal surgical treatment for advanced cancer in the head and neck region was radical surgery followed by radiotherapy. The concept of surgical treatment was wide exposure of the primary pathology followed by radical resection of the tumour. Metastatic neck disease was managed invariably with radical neck dissection. Thus the standard treatment for advanced oral cavity cancer was the commando operation and for most patients with hypopharyngeal cancer, pharyngolaryngo-oesophagectomy and gastric pull-up procedure was done. Although these extensive procedures eradicated the cancer for many patients, the operative mortality was significant. More importantly, the associated morbidity, aesthetically and functionally contributed to the poor quality of life among those patients who survived the operation. In the recent two decades, with the more effective chemotherapy and radiotherapy, many patients with advanced head and neck cancer could be managed successfully with preservation of the organ. The various studies on the behaviour of the primary tumour and their metastatic pattern also guided us to carry out less extensive resections while producing similar tumour clearance. Even when radical resection has to be performed; we can employ the less invasive approaches. This together with the more effective reconstruction and better perioperative support have greatly reduced the mortality, morbidity of patients. This changing philosophy of performing less extensive procedure more effectively and achieve better results, is based on our understanding of the disease and the technological development. These contribute towards better form and functional outcome for our patients.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. is the Sepcial issue: Abstracts of the 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, 2009
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127003
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.627
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.816

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWei, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:00:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:00:47Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, Liverpool, UK., 8-10 July 2009, In Clinical Otolaryngology, v. 34 s1, p. 38-39en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1749-4478-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/127003-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. is the Sepcial issue: Abstracts of the 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, 2009-
dc.description.abstractIn the sixties and the seventies, the optimal surgical treatment for advanced cancer in the head and neck region was radical surgery followed by radiotherapy. The concept of surgical treatment was wide exposure of the primary pathology followed by radical resection of the tumour. Metastatic neck disease was managed invariably with radical neck dissection. Thus the standard treatment for advanced oral cavity cancer was the commando operation and for most patients with hypopharyngeal cancer, pharyngolaryngo-oesophagectomy and gastric pull-up procedure was done. Although these extensive procedures eradicated the cancer for many patients, the operative mortality was significant. More importantly, the associated morbidity, aesthetically and functionally contributed to the poor quality of life among those patients who survived the operation. In the recent two decades, with the more effective chemotherapy and radiotherapy, many patients with advanced head and neck cancer could be managed successfully with preservation of the organ. The various studies on the behaviour of the primary tumour and their metastatic pattern also guided us to carry out less extensive resections while producing similar tumour clearance. Even when radical resection has to be performed; we can employ the less invasive approaches. This together with the more effective reconstruction and better perioperative support have greatly reduced the mortality, morbidity of patients. This changing philosophy of performing less extensive procedure more effectively and achieve better results, is based on our understanding of the disease and the technological development. These contribute towards better form and functional outcome for our patients.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COA-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Otolaryngology-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOtorhinolaryngology-
dc.titleHow my philosophy has changed over the past two decadesen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWei, W: hrmswwi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWei, W=rp00323en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1749-4486.2009.01964_3.x-
dc.identifier.hkuros166311en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros182418-
dc.identifier.volume34-
dc.identifier.issues1-
dc.identifier.spage38-
dc.identifier.epage39-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130711-

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