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Conference Paper: Recurrent head and neck cancer: challenges and limitations

TitleRecurrent head and neck cancer: challenges and limitations
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Otorhinolaryngology
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COA
Citation
The 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, Liverpool, UK., 8-10 July 2009, In Clinical Otolaryngology, v. 34 s1, p. 10 How to Cite?
AbstractRecurrent disease after surgical treatment for advanced stage head and neck cancer with or without chemotherapy and radiotherapy is not uncommon. Further surgical salvage of these recurrent cancers has remained a challenge for the head and neck surgeon. Over the last decade, at the University of Hong Kong Medical Center, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, we have carried out surgical salvage for 377 patients who developed recurrent head and neck cancer after curative surgical resection, this included 174 (46%) patients who had postoperative radiotherapy. The primary tumour sites included the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. The distribution pattern of recurrence was at primary site, around the terminal tracheostome following laryngectomy or laryngopharyngectomy, in the neck nodes and also a few patients with lung metastasis. The surgical salvage rates for these patients were 29% for local recurrence, 30% for tracheostomal recurrence, and 56% for recurrence in unilateral undissected neck, and 32% in unilateral previously dissected neck. The salvage rate for distant metastases in the lung was 11%. The 5-year tumour-free actuarial survival rate was 35% for local disease, 21% for tracheostomal recurrence, 32% for unilateral nodal recurrence in the undissected neck, and 18% for the previously dissected neck. When non-surgical means were employed for salvage, the mean survival period was only 6 months. No patients survived 5 years. The surgical salvage of recurrent head and neck cancers provides the best chance of eradicating the disease, and this treatment option is more effective when the recurrent disease is detected early.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. is the Sepcial issue: Abstracts of the 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, 2009
Instructional Sessions and Lectures – Yearsley Lecture
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126996
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.627
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.816

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWei, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T13:00:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T13:00:24Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, Liverpool, UK., 8-10 July 2009, In Clinical Otolaryngology, v. 34 s1, p. 10en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1749-4478-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126996-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. is the Sepcial issue: Abstracts of the 13th British Academic Conference in Otolaryngology and ENT Expo, 2009-
dc.descriptionInstructional Sessions and Lectures – Yearsley Lecture-
dc.description.abstractRecurrent disease after surgical treatment for advanced stage head and neck cancer with or without chemotherapy and radiotherapy is not uncommon. Further surgical salvage of these recurrent cancers has remained a challenge for the head and neck surgeon. Over the last decade, at the University of Hong Kong Medical Center, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, we have carried out surgical salvage for 377 patients who developed recurrent head and neck cancer after curative surgical resection, this included 174 (46%) patients who had postoperative radiotherapy. The primary tumour sites included the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. The distribution pattern of recurrence was at primary site, around the terminal tracheostome following laryngectomy or laryngopharyngectomy, in the neck nodes and also a few patients with lung metastasis. The surgical salvage rates for these patients were 29% for local recurrence, 30% for tracheostomal recurrence, and 56% for recurrence in unilateral undissected neck, and 32% in unilateral previously dissected neck. The salvage rate for distant metastases in the lung was 11%. The 5-year tumour-free actuarial survival rate was 35% for local disease, 21% for tracheostomal recurrence, 32% for unilateral nodal recurrence in the undissected neck, and 18% for the previously dissected neck. When non-surgical means were employed for salvage, the mean survival period was only 6 months. No patients survived 5 years. The surgical salvage of recurrent head and neck cancers provides the best chance of eradicating the disease, and this treatment option is more effective when the recurrent disease is detected early.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COA-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Otolaryngology-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOtorhinolaryngology-
dc.titleRecurrent head and neck cancer: challenges and limitationsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWei, W: hrmswwi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWei, W=rp00323en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1749-4486.2009.01964_1.x-
dc.identifier.hkuros166310en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros182417-
dc.identifier.volume34-
dc.identifier.issues1-
dc.identifier.spage10-
dc.identifier.epage10-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130711-

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