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Conference Paper: Body mass index and its association with disc degeneration of the lumbar spine in adults

TitleBody mass index and its association with disc degeneration of the lumbar spine in adults
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) 2010 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA., 9-13 March 2010. How to Cite?
AbstractThe association of elevated body mass index (BMI) as a risk factor of disc degeneration remains questionable. As such, we addressed the association of BMI to the presence and severity of disc degeneration in adults. A cross-sectional analysis was performed of 2,252 individuals (range: 21-88 years) of Southern Chinese origin having undergone sagittal T2-weighted MRIs of the lumbar spine. The presence and severity of disc degeneration as well as additional radiographic and clinical findings were assessed. Asian-modified BMI (kg/m2) categories were established. There were 906 males and 1,346 females, with a mean age of 41.4 years. Disc degeneration was noted in 1,598 (71% ) subjects. BMI was significantly higher in subjects with disc degeneration (mean: 23.3 kg/m2) compared to subjects without disc degeneration (mean: 21.6 kg/m2) (p<0.001). Age- and workload severity-adjusted BMI was positively correlated with overall disc degeneration severity (r=0.450, p<0.001), the number of levels of disc degeneration (r=0.365, p<0.001), and the overall disc herniation score (r=0.230, p<0.001). In the adjusted logistic regression model, there was a positive linear dose-response between BMI and disc degeneration (underweight, 1 (Ref); normal, OR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.57-3.23; overweight, OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 2.20-4.73; obese, OR: 5.3, 95% CI: 3.13-9.05; p<0.001). Our study showed a significantly increasing linear dose-response between BMI and disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. Increased severity of disc degeneration was also noted with elevated BMI, in particular overweight and obesity. BMI is an influential risk factor related to disc degeneration.
DescriptionPoster No. P389
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126585

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarppinen, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T12:36:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T12:36:59Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) 2010 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA., 9-13 March 2010.en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126585-
dc.descriptionPoster No. P389-
dc.description.abstractThe association of elevated body mass index (BMI) as a risk factor of disc degeneration remains questionable. As such, we addressed the association of BMI to the presence and severity of disc degeneration in adults. A cross-sectional analysis was performed of 2,252 individuals (range: 21-88 years) of Southern Chinese origin having undergone sagittal T2-weighted MRIs of the lumbar spine. The presence and severity of disc degeneration as well as additional radiographic and clinical findings were assessed. Asian-modified BMI (kg/m2) categories were established. There were 906 males and 1,346 females, with a mean age of 41.4 years. Disc degeneration was noted in 1,598 (71% ) subjects. BMI was significantly higher in subjects with disc degeneration (mean: 23.3 kg/m2) compared to subjects without disc degeneration (mean: 21.6 kg/m2) (p<0.001). Age- and workload severity-adjusted BMI was positively correlated with overall disc degeneration severity (r=0.450, p<0.001), the number of levels of disc degeneration (r=0.365, p<0.001), and the overall disc herniation score (r=0.230, p<0.001). In the adjusted logistic regression model, there was a positive linear dose-response between BMI and disc degeneration (underweight, 1 (Ref); normal, OR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.57-3.23; overweight, OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 2.20-4.73; obese, OR: 5.3, 95% CI: 3.13-9.05; p<0.001). Our study showed a significantly increasing linear dose-response between BMI and disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. Increased severity of disc degeneration was also noted with elevated BMI, in particular overweight and obesity. BMI is an influential risk factor related to disc degeneration.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting-
dc.titleBody mass index and its association with disc degeneration of the lumbar spine in adultsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dsamartzis@msn.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hrmoldk@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros180315en_HK

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