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Article: Smoking-cessation and adherence intervention among Chinese patients with erectile dysfunction
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TitleSmoking-cessation and adherence intervention among Chinese patients with erectile dysfunction
 
AuthorsChan, SSC2
Leung, DYP2
Abdullah, ASM3
Lo, SST4
Yip, AWC1
Kok, WM4
Ho, SY2
Lam, TH2
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/amepre
 
CitationAmerican Journal Of Preventive Medicine, 2010, v. 39 n. 3, p. 251-258 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2010.05.006
 
AbstractBackground: Whether the association between smoking and erectile dysfunction is causal is uncertain. No RCTs have been previously conducted on cessation counseling and additional nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) adherence counseling among smokers with erectile dysfunction. Purpose: The aim of the study was to determine if smoking-cessation counseling in conjunction with NRT increases quitting and NRT adherence compared to usual care, and if stopping smoking would improve erectile function among Chinese erectile dysfunction patients who smoke. Design: An RCT was conducted. Data were collected in 20042007 and analyzed in 2008. Setting/participants: The sample included 719 Chinese adult erectile dysfunction patients who smoked at least 1 cigarette per day, intended to quit smoking within the next 7 days, and would use NRT. Interventions: Group A1 received 15-minute smoking-cessation and 3-minute NRT adherence counseling at baseline, 1 week, and 4 weeks with free NRT for 2 weeks. Group A2 received the same treatment, except for the adherence counseling. Group B received 10 minutes of quitting advice. All subjects received a self-help quitting booklet at first contact. Main outcome measures: Self-reported 7-day tobacco abstinence at 6 months, 4-week NRT adherence at 1 month, and improvement in erectile dysfunction condition at 6 months. Results: The intervention groups (A1+A2) achieved higher rates of abstinence, both self-reported (23% vs 12.8%, RR=1.79, 95% CI=1.22, 2.62) and biochemically validated (11.4% vs 5.5%, RR=2.07, 95% CI=1.13, 3.77), than the control group. The NRT adherence rate did not differ between Groups A1 and A2 (13.7% vs 12.7%, RR=1.08, 95% CI=0.69, 1.69). An improvement in erectile dysfunction status from baseline to 6 months was associated with self-reported quitting at 6 months but not with intervention status. Conclusions: Although quitting smoking was associated with improvement in erectile dysfunction, this study found significant outcome differences among the means used to achieve smoking cessation. Trial registration: ISRCTN13070778. © 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
 
ISSN0749-3797
2012 Impact Factor: 3.945
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.310
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2010.05.006
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000281221900008
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council (RGC), Hong KongHKU7428/03M
Pfizer
Funding Information:

This study was funded by the Competitive Earmarked Research Grant (HKU7428/03M), from the Research Grants Council (RGC), Hong Kong (Principal investigator: TH Lam). Nicotine patches/gums provided free of charge to the subjects were provided free from Pfizer.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSC
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, DYP
 
dc.contributor.authorAbdullah, ASM
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, SST
 
dc.contributor.authorYip, AWC
 
dc.contributor.authorKok, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T12:31:48Z
 
dc.date.available2010-10-31T12:31:48Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Whether the association between smoking and erectile dysfunction is causal is uncertain. No RCTs have been previously conducted on cessation counseling and additional nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) adherence counseling among smokers with erectile dysfunction. Purpose: The aim of the study was to determine if smoking-cessation counseling in conjunction with NRT increases quitting and NRT adherence compared to usual care, and if stopping smoking would improve erectile function among Chinese erectile dysfunction patients who smoke. Design: An RCT was conducted. Data were collected in 20042007 and analyzed in 2008. Setting/participants: The sample included 719 Chinese adult erectile dysfunction patients who smoked at least 1 cigarette per day, intended to quit smoking within the next 7 days, and would use NRT. Interventions: Group A1 received 15-minute smoking-cessation and 3-minute NRT adherence counseling at baseline, 1 week, and 4 weeks with free NRT for 2 weeks. Group A2 received the same treatment, except for the adherence counseling. Group B received 10 minutes of quitting advice. All subjects received a self-help quitting booklet at first contact. Main outcome measures: Self-reported 7-day tobacco abstinence at 6 months, 4-week NRT adherence at 1 month, and improvement in erectile dysfunction condition at 6 months. Results: The intervention groups (A1+A2) achieved higher rates of abstinence, both self-reported (23% vs 12.8%, RR=1.79, 95% CI=1.22, 2.62) and biochemically validated (11.4% vs 5.5%, RR=2.07, 95% CI=1.13, 3.77), than the control group. The NRT adherence rate did not differ between Groups A1 and A2 (13.7% vs 12.7%, RR=1.08, 95% CI=0.69, 1.69). An improvement in erectile dysfunction status from baseline to 6 months was associated with self-reported quitting at 6 months but not with intervention status. Conclusions: Although quitting smoking was associated with improvement in erectile dysfunction, this study found significant outcome differences among the means used to achieve smoking cessation. Trial registration: ISRCTN13070778. © 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Preventive Medicine, 2010, v. 39 n. 3, p. 251-258 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2010.05.006
 
dc.identifier.citeulike7817658
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2010.05.006
 
dc.identifier.epage258
 
dc.identifier.hkuros178700
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281221900008
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council (RGC), Hong KongHKU7428/03M
Pfizer
Funding Information:

This study was funded by the Competitive Earmarked Research Grant (HKU7428/03M), from the Research Grants Council (RGC), Hong Kong (Principal investigator: TH Lam). Nicotine patches/gums provided free of charge to the subjects were provided free from Pfizer.

 
dc.identifier.issn0749-3797
2012 Impact Factor: 3.945
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.310
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid20709257
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955909534
 
dc.identifier.spage251
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126492
 
dc.identifier.volume39
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/amepre
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group
 
dc.subject.meshDirective Counseling - methods
 
dc.subject.meshErectile Dysfunction - etiology
 
dc.subject.meshSmoking - adverse effects - prevention and control
 
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessation - methods
 
dc.titleSmoking-cessation and adherence intervention among Chinese patients with erectile dysfunction
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Yip, AWC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kok, WM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ho, SY</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Kwong Wah Hospital
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Boston University
  4. Family Planning Association of Hong Kong